Tagged with #folk

Show Results (157)

  • The NOTFC is organized for the charitable and educational purposes of preserving and promoting oldtime fiddling and related traditional arts. ----------------------------------------------------------------- History of Weiser's Fiddle Contest - In 1953, the city of Weiser, Idaho began sponsoring an annual contest which has become one of the most formal and prestigious fiddler contests held. In this same year, a contest was held in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico, which saw the result of the change in judging. It was now based on standards of skill, hokum was not allowed, and there was a strict time limit for the contestants. Some of the “old-timers” had trouble adapting. One of the fiddlers, Eck Robertson played “Sally Goodin” which he usually played in about eighteen different ways, and at times took five to six minutes to play all the way through. This year, he was about half way through when the whistle blew, but he just kept on playing until someone came onto the stage and took him off. He was disqualified at this contest but in 1962 he won the senior division at Weiser. The fiddle contests at Weiser today have very clear rules. Each contestant plays three tunes; one of the tunes must be a hoedown, one must be a waltz, the other is a “tune of choice” (something other than a waltz or hoedown). Some contests are held with less restrictions and include audience participation. A time limit is enforced for each fiddler. Contestants are classified into different age groups and judging is based on danceability, oldtime style, rhythm, and tone. If a contestant wins the first round they move onto the second/final round or playoff. At Weiser, competing in all of the playoffs to win the championship takes five rounds and fifteen tunes. One change that has happened in the modern era that began in 1990 or 1991 is that most contests have eliminated the separate ladies division, as acknowledgment that today’s women are as competent as the men and capable of competing on an equal basis. History of the National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest & Festival - Fiddling came to Weiser in 1863 when the Logans established a way station here and covered wagon emigrants stopped for rest and recreation. Newspaper files report fiddling contests here from 1914 to WWI. The resurrection of fiddling in Weiser was due to efforts led by Blaine Stubblefield, Chamber of Commerce Secretary from 1948 until his death in December, 1960. Blaine was raised on fiddling in Oregon’s Wallowa Valley above Hells Canyon. He had spent several years researching fiddle music for the Library of Congress. His interest in the music led him to ask the Chamber Directors to allocate $175 for a fiddle contest. Nothing happened until January, 1953, when the idea was proposed to hold the contest during intermissions of the Fifth Annual Weiser Square Dance Festival. Prize money was underwritten by two individuals and the first official fiddling event came to life on April 18, 1953. It was billed as the Northwest Mountain Fiddlers’ Contest and was a huge success. The name was changed to the Northwest Oldtime Fiddling Championships in 1956 when a regional division was added for out-of- area fiddlers. The present National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest was inaugurated in 1963 in conjunction with Idaho’s Territorial Centennial observances. Through all these years of fiddling in Weiser, the town of 5,200 people pulls hundreds of volunteers together each year in support of their nationally recognized event. This week of intense competition and endless jamming brings together young and old for the purpose of perpetuating fiddling around the world. The National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest now certifies fiddling contests in 29 states in order to facilitate interest and maintain the integrity of fiddling contests. Almost 350 contestants compete in 9 divisions each year. The week long competition also includes musical entertainment nightly from groups from around the U.S. Once you’ve been to the National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest you’ll see why Weiser has been recognized as the “Fiddling Capital Of The World”!

  • Welcome to the COYOTE MUSIC DEN - Live Music Concert Listening Room and Lesson Studio on the edge of the harbor in Community Square, Ocracoke Island, NC. A historic, magical setting. "Coyote Plus One" is an evening of well-crafted spontaneity with Coyote (Marcy and Lou) and a different guest each week. (Tuesdays, May 23 - Sept 26) Sponsored by Dajio Restaurant. "An evening with COYOTE - Marcy & Lou" This is a long-awaited return by popular demand of this duo to the stage - charming, powerful original songs and unique covers. (Wednesdays, May 24 - Sept 27) "Martin Garrish & Friends - "Playing Your Ocracoke Memories" hosted by this beloved island native along with Coyote (Marcy & Lou) and special guests. (Fridays, April 14 - Nov 22 Thanksgiving Show) - December 8 is the Christmas Show and final show of 2017. These "house concert style" shows are held (and broadcast live) on Ocracoke Island, NC from the COYOTE MUSIC DEN. COYOTE are Marcy Brenner & Lou Castro who make Ocracoke Island, NC their home. Ever "the trickster," Coyote draw from a huge arc of influences (and instruments!) from classical to heavy metal, in both original songs and adapting covers. They have an engaging and spontaneous presence that invites listeners and audiences into their proverbial living room with enchanting, intimate songs and colorful music tinged with folk, rock, blues and jazz flavors. For more info visit www.coyotemusic.net Coyote Music Den info only line (252) 928-6874 (music) Photos & Graphics by Jessie Morrissey, Carol Woolgar Signs by Len Skinner, Bob Imber

  • The Maes, Nearly Human opens

    Tue Jun 19th 8:00 EDT - Folk, Country

    For 60 years, Club Passim in Harvard Square has been known as a premier listening room presenting new and established performers of genres ranging from folk and acoustic to jazz, and everything in between. The historic non-profit music venue presents over 400 shows per year to an audience of over 30,000.

  • The NOTFC is organized for the charitable and educational purposes of preserving and promoting oldtime fiddling and related traditional arts. ----------------------------------------------------------------- History of Weiser's Fiddle Contest - In 1953, the city of Weiser, Idaho began sponsoring an annual contest which has become one of the most formal and prestigious fiddler contests held. In this same year, a contest was held in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico, which saw the result of the change in judging. It was now based on standards of skill, hokum was not allowed, and there was a strict time limit for the contestants. Some of the “old-timers” had trouble adapting. One of the fiddlers, Eck Robertson played “Sally Goodin” which he usually played in about eighteen different ways, and at times took five to six minutes to play all the way through. This year, he was about half way through when the whistle blew, but he just kept on playing until someone came onto the stage and took him off. He was disqualified at this contest but in 1962 he won the senior division at Weiser. The fiddle contests at Weiser today have very clear rules. Each contestant plays three tunes; one of the tunes must be a hoedown, one must be a waltz, the other is a “tune of choice” (something other than a waltz or hoedown). Some contests are held with less restrictions and include audience participation. A time limit is enforced for each fiddler. Contestants are classified into different age groups and judging is based on danceability, oldtime style, rhythm, and tone. If a contestant wins the first round they move onto the second/final round or playoff. At Weiser, competing in all of the playoffs to win the championship takes five rounds and fifteen tunes. One change that has happened in the modern era that began in 1990 or 1991 is that most contests have eliminated the separate ladies division, as acknowledgment that today’s women are as competent as the men and capable of competing on an equal basis. History of the National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest & Festival - Fiddling came to Weiser in 1863 when the Logans established a way station here and covered wagon emigrants stopped for rest and recreation. Newspaper files report fiddling contests here from 1914 to WWI. The resurrection of fiddling in Weiser was due to efforts led by Blaine Stubblefield, Chamber of Commerce Secretary from 1948 until his death in December, 1960. Blaine was raised on fiddling in Oregon’s Wallowa Valley above Hells Canyon. He had spent several years researching fiddle music for the Library of Congress. His interest in the music led him to ask the Chamber Directors to allocate $175 for a fiddle contest. Nothing happened until January, 1953, when the idea was proposed to hold the contest during intermissions of the Fifth Annual Weiser Square Dance Festival. Prize money was underwritten by two individuals and the first official fiddling event came to life on April 18, 1953. It was billed as the Northwest Mountain Fiddlers’ Contest and was a huge success. The name was changed to the Northwest Oldtime Fiddling Championships in 1956 when a regional division was added for out-of- area fiddlers. The present National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest was inaugurated in 1963 in conjunction with Idaho’s Territorial Centennial observances. Through all these years of fiddling in Weiser, the town of 5,200 people pulls hundreds of volunteers together each year in support of their nationally recognized event. This week of intense competition and endless jamming brings together young and old for the purpose of perpetuating fiddling around the world. The National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest now certifies fiddling contests in 29 states in order to facilitate interest and maintain the integrity of fiddling contests. Almost 350 contestants compete in 9 divisions each year. The week long competition also includes musical entertainment nightly from groups from around the U.S. Once you’ve been to the National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest you’ll see why Weiser has been recognized as the “Fiddling Capital Of The World”!

  • MLAG Board Members Concert

    Wed Jun 20th 7:30 EDT -

    For more than 25 years, the Mountain Laurel Autoharp Gathering has been the world's premier Autoharp event, featuring workshops, live performances and the annual Autoharp Championship. <p/> Some of the performances during our annual event will be streamed live for the first time in 2016 through this site. <p/> While you won't get to have he experience of hanging out with your friends and fellow musicians, jamming until the early morning in the campground, or learn new skills in our workshops, you will now be able to experience some of what you're missing on the main stage.

  • Windborne Stunningly powerful vocal harmony!

    Wed Jun 20th 7:30 EDT - Event, Folk

    The Burren Backroom Series, launched in October of 2011, has already created many memorable, intimate, informal presentations. These shows are held in a truly atmospheric space, created by well-known traditional musicians Tommy & Louise McCarthy in Davis Square, Somerville, Masachusetts. Wednesday night shows are hosted by Brian O'Donovan of "A Celtic Sojurn" on WGBH radio, these gatherings feature core performers from many aspects of traditional music as well as special guests, & conversations around the music. Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights shows feature an eclectic mix of artists and styles of music. To see details about coming down to The Burren Backroom Series, check out www.burren.com for all list of all shows and many other musical events in our front and back rooms

  • COYOTE -- Marcy & Lou "Just We Two"

    Wed Jun 20th 8:00 EDT - Folk, Blues

    Welcome to the COYOTE MUSIC DEN - Live Music Concert Listening Room and Lesson Studio on the edge of the harbor in Community Square, Ocracoke Island, NC. A historic, magical setting. "Coyote Plus One" is an evening of well-crafted spontaneity with Coyote (Marcy and Lou) and a different guest each week. (Tuesdays, May 23 - Sept 26) Sponsored by Dajio Restaurant. "An evening with COYOTE - Marcy & Lou" This is a long-awaited return by popular demand of this duo to the stage - charming, powerful original songs and unique covers. (Wednesdays, May 24 - Sept 27) "Martin Garrish & Friends - "Playing Your Ocracoke Memories" hosted by this beloved island native along with Coyote (Marcy & Lou) and special guests. (Fridays, April 14 - Nov 22 Thanksgiving Show) - December 8 is the Christmas Show and final show of 2017. These "house concert style" shows are held (and broadcast live) on Ocracoke Island, NC from the COYOTE MUSIC DEN. COYOTE are Marcy Brenner & Lou Castro who make Ocracoke Island, NC their home. Ever "the trickster," Coyote draw from a huge arc of influences (and instruments!) from classical to heavy metal, in both original songs and adapting covers. They have an engaging and spontaneous presence that invites listeners and audiences into their proverbial living room with enchanting, intimate songs and colorful music tinged with folk, rock, blues and jazz flavors. For more info visit www.coyotemusic.net Coyote Music Den info only line (252) 928-6874 (music) Photos & Graphics by Jessie Morrissey, Carol Woolgar Signs by Len Skinner, Bob Imber

  • Aubryn's Weekly Webconcert ft Sarah Aili

    Wed Jun 20th 9:30 EDT - Event, Comedy

    Every week for over 5 years and counting, I (Aubryn) bring some of the best singer/songwriters Nashville has to offer every Wednesday evening at 8:30pm Central (that's 6:30pm for you west coast people). We take turns playing original songs and there is ALWAYS harmony bc I can't help myself. What better way to spend a Wednesday evening?

  • Jana Pochop & Michael O'Connor Live from a Mile High

    Wed Jun 20th 9:30 EDT - Rock, Folk

    "Michael O’Connor is well-acknowledged as a great guitarist, but you should listen to his songs as well. He writes beautifully, authentically and comes by that gritty gravel road of a voice honestly. You’ll not find a forced moment in his work.” – Rod Picott

  • The NOTFC is organized for the charitable and educational purposes of preserving and promoting oldtime fiddling and related traditional arts. ----------------------------------------------------------------- History of Weiser's Fiddle Contest - In 1953, the city of Weiser, Idaho began sponsoring an annual contest which has become one of the most formal and prestigious fiddler contests held. In this same year, a contest was held in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico, which saw the result of the change in judging. It was now based on standards of skill, hokum was not allowed, and there was a strict time limit for the contestants. Some of the “old-timers” had trouble adapting. One of the fiddlers, Eck Robertson played “Sally Goodin” which he usually played in about eighteen different ways, and at times took five to six minutes to play all the way through. This year, he was about half way through when the whistle blew, but he just kept on playing until someone came onto the stage and took him off. He was disqualified at this contest but in 1962 he won the senior division at Weiser. The fiddle contests at Weiser today have very clear rules. Each contestant plays three tunes; one of the tunes must be a hoedown, one must be a waltz, the other is a “tune of choice” (something other than a waltz or hoedown). Some contests are held with less restrictions and include audience participation. A time limit is enforced for each fiddler. Contestants are classified into different age groups and judging is based on danceability, oldtime style, rhythm, and tone. If a contestant wins the first round they move onto the second/final round or playoff. At Weiser, competing in all of the playoffs to win the championship takes five rounds and fifteen tunes. One change that has happened in the modern era that began in 1990 or 1991 is that most contests have eliminated the separate ladies division, as acknowledgment that today’s women are as competent as the men and capable of competing on an equal basis. History of the National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest & Festival - Fiddling came to Weiser in 1863 when the Logans established a way station here and covered wagon emigrants stopped for rest and recreation. Newspaper files report fiddling contests here from 1914 to WWI. The resurrection of fiddling in Weiser was due to efforts led by Blaine Stubblefield, Chamber of Commerce Secretary from 1948 until his death in December, 1960. Blaine was raised on fiddling in Oregon’s Wallowa Valley above Hells Canyon. He had spent several years researching fiddle music for the Library of Congress. His interest in the music led him to ask the Chamber Directors to allocate $175 for a fiddle contest. Nothing happened until January, 1953, when the idea was proposed to hold the contest during intermissions of the Fifth Annual Weiser Square Dance Festival. Prize money was underwritten by two individuals and the first official fiddling event came to life on April 18, 1953. It was billed as the Northwest Mountain Fiddlers’ Contest and was a huge success. The name was changed to the Northwest Oldtime Fiddling Championships in 1956 when a regional division was added for out-of- area fiddlers. The present National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest was inaugurated in 1963 in conjunction with Idaho’s Territorial Centennial observances. Through all these years of fiddling in Weiser, the town of 5,200 people pulls hundreds of volunteers together each year in support of their nationally recognized event. This week of intense competition and endless jamming brings together young and old for the purpose of perpetuating fiddling around the world. The National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest now certifies fiddling contests in 29 states in order to facilitate interest and maintain the integrity of fiddling contests. Almost 350 contestants compete in 9 divisions each year. The week long competition also includes musical entertainment nightly from groups from around the U.S. Once you’ve been to the National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest you’ll see why Weiser has been recognized as the “Fiddling Capital Of The World”!

  • The NOTFC is organized for the charitable and educational purposes of preserving and promoting oldtime fiddling and related traditional arts. ----------------------------------------------------------------- History of Weiser's Fiddle Contest - In 1953, the city of Weiser, Idaho began sponsoring an annual contest which has become one of the most formal and prestigious fiddler contests held. In this same year, a contest was held in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico, which saw the result of the change in judging. It was now based on standards of skill, hokum was not allowed, and there was a strict time limit for the contestants. Some of the “old-timers” had trouble adapting. One of the fiddlers, Eck Robertson played “Sally Goodin” which he usually played in about eighteen different ways, and at times took five to six minutes to play all the way through. This year, he was about half way through when the whistle blew, but he just kept on playing until someone came onto the stage and took him off. He was disqualified at this contest but in 1962 he won the senior division at Weiser. The fiddle contests at Weiser today have very clear rules. Each contestant plays three tunes; one of the tunes must be a hoedown, one must be a waltz, the other is a “tune of choice” (something other than a waltz or hoedown). Some contests are held with less restrictions and include audience participation. A time limit is enforced for each fiddler. Contestants are classified into different age groups and judging is based on danceability, oldtime style, rhythm, and tone. If a contestant wins the first round they move onto the second/final round or playoff. At Weiser, competing in all of the playoffs to win the championship takes five rounds and fifteen tunes. One change that has happened in the modern era that began in 1990 or 1991 is that most contests have eliminated the separate ladies division, as acknowledgment that today’s women are as competent as the men and capable of competing on an equal basis. History of the National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest & Festival - Fiddling came to Weiser in 1863 when the Logans established a way station here and covered wagon emigrants stopped for rest and recreation. Newspaper files report fiddling contests here from 1914 to WWI. The resurrection of fiddling in Weiser was due to efforts led by Blaine Stubblefield, Chamber of Commerce Secretary from 1948 until his death in December, 1960. Blaine was raised on fiddling in Oregon’s Wallowa Valley above Hells Canyon. He had spent several years researching fiddle music for the Library of Congress. His interest in the music led him to ask the Chamber Directors to allocate $175 for a fiddle contest. Nothing happened until January, 1953, when the idea was proposed to hold the contest during intermissions of the Fifth Annual Weiser Square Dance Festival. Prize money was underwritten by two individuals and the first official fiddling event came to life on April 18, 1953. It was billed as the Northwest Mountain Fiddlers’ Contest and was a huge success. The name was changed to the Northwest Oldtime Fiddling Championships in 1956 when a regional division was added for out-of- area fiddlers. The present National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest was inaugurated in 1963 in conjunction with Idaho’s Territorial Centennial observances. Through all these years of fiddling in Weiser, the town of 5,200 people pulls hundreds of volunteers together each year in support of their nationally recognized event. This week of intense competition and endless jamming brings together young and old for the purpose of perpetuating fiddling around the world. The National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest now certifies fiddling contests in 29 states in order to facilitate interest and maintain the integrity of fiddling contests. Almost 350 contestants compete in 9 divisions each year. The week long competition also includes musical entertainment nightly from groups from around the U.S. Once you’ve been to the National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest you’ll see why Weiser has been recognized as the “Fiddling Capital Of The World”!

  • Vanessa Lively / Nicolette Good / Erin Ivey

    Thu Jun 21st 1:30 EDT - Folk, Pop

    Vanessa Lively’s music is an eclectic blend of folk and world music that join heartfelt lyrics with soulful vocals. Margaret Moser of The Austin Chronicle described Vanessa’s music as “folk music on fire with worldly rhythms and a Latin pulse.” She is an artist, a mother, and a passionate community activist. Her dream was to create a music program for Austin’s homeless and recently homed community, and to empower artists through music to create change within their communities. In May of 2017, Vanessa was awarded the Artist Activist Award by Music2Life - a nonprofit founded by Noel Paul Stookey (of Peter, Paul and Mary) and his daughter Elizabeth Stookey Sunde; this grant enabled Vanessa to create Home Street Music. At home in Austin, TX, Lively moves between community and family life, music and touring, and painting (her work is featured on the cover of Return to Waves). She was named one of the Top 10 Artist of the Year by KUNC in Colorado in 2011. Mario Tarradell of The Dallas Morning News writes, “Vanessa Lively is a true multidiscipline artist. She’s a singer, songwriter, musician and painter with a do-it-yourself attitude and a compassionate spirit.”

  • Simon de Voil

    Thu Jun 21st 2:00 EDT -

    Simon de Voil has been performing since 1999, he has since released four solo albums: Sacred Earth (2008), The Boat Builder (2010), Heart Medicine (2011) and Trust (2017.) In recent years Simon has toured internationally and gained a reputation as a talented singer-songwriter and storyteller; he pairs thoughtful and inspiring lyrics with cracking good tunes, compelling piano melodies, and a rich, tender vocal style. His music explores themes of the inner landscape of the soul, the enchantment of the natural world and a personal journey to follow an unexpected calling. Simon's musical work includes playing for rites of passage, healing, worship services, and community-building events; lately some of his favorite gigs have been played at youth centres, sickbeds, industrial workshops, homeless drop-in centers and ancient chapels. His unusual life and music are the focus of the award-winning documentary film ‘Funny Kinda Guy.’ You can find out more about Simon and hear his music at www.simondevoil.com

  • WUMB Presents Melissa Ferrick

    Thu Jun 21st 7:00 EDT - Event, Folk

    The Burren Backroom Series, launched in October of 2011, has already created many memorable, intimate, informal presentations. These shows are held in a truly atmospheric space, created by well-known traditional musicians Tommy & Louise McCarthy in Davis Square, Somerville, Masachusetts. Wednesday night shows are hosted by Brian O'Donovan of "A Celtic Sojurn" on WGBH radio, these gatherings feature core performers from many aspects of traditional music as well as special guests, & conversations around the music. Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights shows feature an eclectic mix of artists and styles of music. To see details about coming down to The Burren Backroom Series, check out www.burren.com for all list of all shows and many other musical events in our front and back rooms

  • Dave Richardson - Branch & Thorn Gathering

    Thu Jun 21st 7:30 EDT - Folk

    Dave Richardson is a folk singer-songwriter based in New England. He is an inviting and engaging performer with a pure, rich and natural voice. He is based in New Hampshire by way of Maine, Colorado, Massachusetts, and New York. The places he’s traveled and the people he has encountered feature prominently in his poppy folk songs. Dave invites listeners to experience snippets of life through his songs: a fragment of overheard conversation, the recollection of a feeling, a snapshot of an event.

  • For more than 25 years, the Mountain Laurel Autoharp Gathering has been the world's premier Autoharp event, featuring workshops, live performances and the annual Autoharp Championship. <p/> Some of the performances during our annual event will be streamed live for the first time in 2016 through this site. <p/> While you won't get to have he experience of hanging out with your friends and fellow musicians, jamming until the early morning in the campground, or learn new skills in our workshops, you will now be able to experience some of what you're missing on the main stage.

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