Tagged with #folk

Show Results (110)

  • Susan Cattaneo Presents Rod Abernethy and Ian Flanigan

    Sun Jun 16th 4:00 EDT - Event, Folk

    The Burren Backroom Series, launched in October of 2011, has already created many memorable, intimate, informal presentations. These shows are held in a truly atmospheric space, created by well-known traditional musicians Tommy & Louise McCarthy in Davis Square, Somerville, Masachusetts. Wednesday night shows are hosted by Brian O'Donovan of "A Celtic Sojurn" on WGBH radio, these gatherings feature core performers from many aspects of traditional music as well as special guests, & conversations around the music. Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights shows feature an eclectic mix of artists and styles of music. To see details about coming down to The Burren Backroom Series, check out www.burren.com for all list of all shows and many other musical events in our front and back rooms

  • THE WEEKLY SHOW - David Ippolito LIVE from New York City

    Sun Jun 16th 4:00 EDT - Comedy, Rock

    WHAT AN AMAZING CROWD LAST WEEK — We've begun the new season in Central Park. But we'll be here almost EVERY weekend all summer. I love sharing music and laughs with you guys online. Join me and my fellow-New Yorkers and sweet people from all across the country and in different parts of the world again this weekend. GONNA BE FUN! — David Ippolito is an under-the-radar singer/songwriter/playwright/humorist in New York City known to hundreds of thousands as "That Guitar Man from Central Park". (http://www.thatguitarman.com)

  • Western Centuries,Cousin Bobby

    Sun Jun 16th 7:00 EDT - Event, Folk

    The Burren Backroom Series, launched in October of 2011, has already created many memorable, intimate, informal presentations. These shows are held in a truly atmospheric space, created by well-known traditional musicians Tommy & Louise McCarthy in Davis Square, Somerville, Masachusetts. Wednesday night shows are hosted by Brian O'Donovan of "A Celtic Sojurn" on WGBH radio, these gatherings feature core performers from many aspects of traditional music as well as special guests, & conversations around the music. Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights shows feature an eclectic mix of artists and styles of music. To see details about coming down to The Burren Backroom Series, check out www.burren.com for all list of all shows and many other musical events in our front and back rooms

  • National Oldtime Fiddlers' Contest & Festival

    Mon Jun 17th 11:30 EDT - Event, Jazz

    The NOTFC is organized for the charitable and educational purposes of preserving and promoting oldtime fiddling and related traditional arts. ----------------------------------------------------------------- History of Weiser's Fiddle Contest - In 1953, the city of Weiser, Idaho began sponsoring an annual contest which has become one of the most formal and prestigious fiddler contests held. In this same year, a contest was held in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico, which saw the result of the change in judging. It was now based on standards of skill, hokum was not allowed, and there was a strict time limit for the contestants. Some of the “old-timers” had trouble adapting. One of the fiddlers, Eck Robertson played “Sally Goodin” which he usually played in about eighteen different ways, and at times took five to six minutes to play all the way through. This year, he was about half way through when the whistle blew, but he just kept on playing until someone came onto the stage and took him off. He was disqualified at this contest but in 1962 he won the senior division at Weiser. The fiddle contests at Weiser today have very clear rules. Each contestant plays three tunes; one of the tunes must be a hoedown, one must be a waltz, the other is a “tune of choice” (something other than a waltz or hoedown). Some contests are held with less restrictions and include audience participation. A time limit is enforced for each fiddler. Contestants are classified into different age groups and judging is based on danceability, oldtime style, rhythm, and tone. If a contestant wins the first round they move onto the second/final round or playoff. At Weiser, competing in all of the playoffs to win the championship takes five rounds and fifteen tunes. One change that has happened in the modern era that began in 1990 or 1991 is that most contests have eliminated the separate ladies division, as acknowledgment that today’s women are as competent as the men and capable of competing on an equal basis. History of the National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest & Festival - Fiddling came to Weiser in 1863 when the Logans established a way station here and covered wagon emigrants stopped for rest and recreation. Newspaper files report fiddling contests here from 1914 to WWI. The resurrection of fiddling in Weiser was due to efforts led by Blaine Stubblefield, Chamber of Commerce Secretary from 1948 until his death in December, 1960. Blaine was raised on fiddling in Oregon’s Wallowa Valley above Hells Canyon. He had spent several years researching fiddle music for the Library of Congress. His interest in the music led him to ask the Chamber Directors to allocate $175 for a fiddle contest. Nothing happened until January, 1953, when the idea was proposed to hold the contest during intermissions of the Fifth Annual Weiser Square Dance Festival. Prize money was underwritten by two individuals and the first official fiddling event came to life on April 18, 1953. It was billed as the Northwest Mountain Fiddlers’ Contest and was a huge success. The name was changed to the Northwest Oldtime Fiddling Championships in 1956 when a regional division was added for out-of- area fiddlers. The present National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest was inaugurated in 1963 in conjunction with Idaho’s Territorial Centennial observances. Through all these years of fiddling in Weiser, the town of 5,200 people pulls hundreds of volunteers together each year in support of their nationally recognized event. This week of intense competition and endless jamming brings together young and old for the purpose of perpetuating fiddling around the world. The National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest now certifies fiddling contests in 29 states in order to facilitate interest and maintain the integrity of fiddling contests. Almost 350 contestants compete in 9 divisions each year. The week long competition also includes musical entertainment nightly from groups from around the U.S. Once you’ve been to the National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest you’ll see why Weiser has been recognized as the “Fiddling Capital Of The World”!

  • National Oldtime Fiddlers' Contest & Festival

    Mon Jun 17th 9:55 EDT - Event, Jazz

    The NOTFC is organized for the charitable and educational purposes of preserving and promoting oldtime fiddling and related traditional arts. ----------------------------------------------------------------- History of Weiser's Fiddle Contest - In 1953, the city of Weiser, Idaho began sponsoring an annual contest which has become one of the most formal and prestigious fiddler contests held. In this same year, a contest was held in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico, which saw the result of the change in judging. It was now based on standards of skill, hokum was not allowed, and there was a strict time limit for the contestants. Some of the “old-timers” had trouble adapting. One of the fiddlers, Eck Robertson played “Sally Goodin” which he usually played in about eighteen different ways, and at times took five to six minutes to play all the way through. This year, he was about half way through when the whistle blew, but he just kept on playing until someone came onto the stage and took him off. He was disqualified at this contest but in 1962 he won the senior division at Weiser. The fiddle contests at Weiser today have very clear rules. Each contestant plays three tunes; one of the tunes must be a hoedown, one must be a waltz, the other is a “tune of choice” (something other than a waltz or hoedown). Some contests are held with less restrictions and include audience participation. A time limit is enforced for each fiddler. Contestants are classified into different age groups and judging is based on danceability, oldtime style, rhythm, and tone. If a contestant wins the first round they move onto the second/final round or playoff. At Weiser, competing in all of the playoffs to win the championship takes five rounds and fifteen tunes. One change that has happened in the modern era that began in 1990 or 1991 is that most contests have eliminated the separate ladies division, as acknowledgment that today’s women are as competent as the men and capable of competing on an equal basis. History of the National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest & Festival - Fiddling came to Weiser in 1863 when the Logans established a way station here and covered wagon emigrants stopped for rest and recreation. Newspaper files report fiddling contests here from 1914 to WWI. The resurrection of fiddling in Weiser was due to efforts led by Blaine Stubblefield, Chamber of Commerce Secretary from 1948 until his death in December, 1960. Blaine was raised on fiddling in Oregon’s Wallowa Valley above Hells Canyon. He had spent several years researching fiddle music for the Library of Congress. His interest in the music led him to ask the Chamber Directors to allocate $175 for a fiddle contest. Nothing happened until January, 1953, when the idea was proposed to hold the contest during intermissions of the Fifth Annual Weiser Square Dance Festival. Prize money was underwritten by two individuals and the first official fiddling event came to life on April 18, 1953. It was billed as the Northwest Mountain Fiddlers’ Contest and was a huge success. The name was changed to the Northwest Oldtime Fiddling Championships in 1956 when a regional division was added for out-of- area fiddlers. The present National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest was inaugurated in 1963 in conjunction with Idaho’s Territorial Centennial observances. Through all these years of fiddling in Weiser, the town of 5,200 people pulls hundreds of volunteers together each year in support of their nationally recognized event. This week of intense competition and endless jamming brings together young and old for the purpose of perpetuating fiddling around the world. The National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest now certifies fiddling contests in 29 states in order to facilitate interest and maintain the integrity of fiddling contests. Almost 350 contestants compete in 9 divisions each year. The week long competition also includes musical entertainment nightly from groups from around the U.S. Once you’ve been to the National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest you’ll see why Weiser has been recognized as the “Fiddling Capital Of The World”!

  • National Oldtime Fiddlers' Contest & Festival

    Tue Jun 18th 5:30 EDT - Event, Jazz

    The NOTFC is organized for the charitable and educational purposes of preserving and promoting oldtime fiddling and related traditional arts. ----------------------------------------------------------------- History of Weiser's Fiddle Contest - In 1953, the city of Weiser, Idaho began sponsoring an annual contest which has become one of the most formal and prestigious fiddler contests held. In this same year, a contest was held in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico, which saw the result of the change in judging. It was now based on standards of skill, hokum was not allowed, and there was a strict time limit for the contestants. Some of the “old-timers” had trouble adapting. One of the fiddlers, Eck Robertson played “Sally Goodin” which he usually played in about eighteen different ways, and at times took five to six minutes to play all the way through. This year, he was about half way through when the whistle blew, but he just kept on playing until someone came onto the stage and took him off. He was disqualified at this contest but in 1962 he won the senior division at Weiser. The fiddle contests at Weiser today have very clear rules. Each contestant plays three tunes; one of the tunes must be a hoedown, one must be a waltz, the other is a “tune of choice” (something other than a waltz or hoedown). Some contests are held with less restrictions and include audience participation. A time limit is enforced for each fiddler. Contestants are classified into different age groups and judging is based on danceability, oldtime style, rhythm, and tone. If a contestant wins the first round they move onto the second/final round or playoff. At Weiser, competing in all of the playoffs to win the championship takes five rounds and fifteen tunes. One change that has happened in the modern era that began in 1990 or 1991 is that most contests have eliminated the separate ladies division, as acknowledgment that today’s women are as competent as the men and capable of competing on an equal basis. History of the National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest & Festival - Fiddling came to Weiser in 1863 when the Logans established a way station here and covered wagon emigrants stopped for rest and recreation. Newspaper files report fiddling contests here from 1914 to WWI. The resurrection of fiddling in Weiser was due to efforts led by Blaine Stubblefield, Chamber of Commerce Secretary from 1948 until his death in December, 1960. Blaine was raised on fiddling in Oregon’s Wallowa Valley above Hells Canyon. He had spent several years researching fiddle music for the Library of Congress. His interest in the music led him to ask the Chamber Directors to allocate $175 for a fiddle contest. Nothing happened until January, 1953, when the idea was proposed to hold the contest during intermissions of the Fifth Annual Weiser Square Dance Festival. Prize money was underwritten by two individuals and the first official fiddling event came to life on April 18, 1953. It was billed as the Northwest Mountain Fiddlers’ Contest and was a huge success. The name was changed to the Northwest Oldtime Fiddling Championships in 1956 when a regional division was added for out-of- area fiddlers. The present National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest was inaugurated in 1963 in conjunction with Idaho’s Territorial Centennial observances. Through all these years of fiddling in Weiser, the town of 5,200 people pulls hundreds of volunteers together each year in support of their nationally recognized event. This week of intense competition and endless jamming brings together young and old for the purpose of perpetuating fiddling around the world. The National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest now certifies fiddling contests in 29 states in order to facilitate interest and maintain the integrity of fiddling contests. Almost 350 contestants compete in 9 divisions each year. The week long competition also includes musical entertainment nightly from groups from around the U.S. Once you’ve been to the National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest you’ll see why Weiser has been recognized as the “Fiddling Capital Of The World”!

  • Welcome to the COYOTE MUSIC DEN - Live Music Concert Listening Room and Lesson Studio on the edge of the harbor in Community Square, Ocracoke Island, NC. A historic, magical setting. FRIDAYS (April 19 - Sept 27 2019) "Coyote In Concert” with Kim France, Kate McNally or just the two of us. (Expect some surprises!) TUESDAYS (May 21 - Sept 24 2019) "Coyote Plus One" is an evening of well-crafted spontaneity with Coyote (Marcy and Lou) and a different guest each week. (Tuesdays, May 23 - Sept These "house concert style" listening room shows are held (and broadcast live) on Ocracoke Island, NC from the COYOTE MUSIC DEN. Sponsored by Dajio Restaurant. COYOTE are Marcy Brenner & Lou Castro who make Ocracoke Island, NC their home. Ever "the trickster," Coyote draw from a huge arc of influences (and instruments!) from classical to heavy metal, in both original songs and adapting covers. They have an engaging and spontaneous presence that invites listeners and audiences into their proverbial living room with enchanting, intimate songs and colorful music tinged with folk, rock, blues and jazz flavors. For more info visit www.coyotemusic.net Coyote Music Den info only line (252) 256-2081 Photos & Graphics by Jessie Morrissey, Carol Woolgar Signs by Len Skinner, Bob Imber

  • Rachel Marie, Lindsey Sampson and Jim Trick

    Tue Jun 18th 8:00 EDT - Folk, Country

    For 60 years, Club Passim in Harvard Square has been known as a premier listening room presenting new and established performers of genres ranging from folk and acoustic to jazz, and everything in between. The historic non-profit music venue presents over 400 shows per year to an audience of over 30,000.

  • National Oldtime Fiddlers' Contest & Festival

    Tue Jun 18th 9:50 EDT - Event, Jazz

    The NOTFC is organized for the charitable and educational purposes of preserving and promoting oldtime fiddling and related traditional arts. ----------------------------------------------------------------- History of Weiser's Fiddle Contest - In 1953, the city of Weiser, Idaho began sponsoring an annual contest which has become one of the most formal and prestigious fiddler contests held. In this same year, a contest was held in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico, which saw the result of the change in judging. It was now based on standards of skill, hokum was not allowed, and there was a strict time limit for the contestants. Some of the “old-timers” had trouble adapting. One of the fiddlers, Eck Robertson played “Sally Goodin” which he usually played in about eighteen different ways, and at times took five to six minutes to play all the way through. This year, he was about half way through when the whistle blew, but he just kept on playing until someone came onto the stage and took him off. He was disqualified at this contest but in 1962 he won the senior division at Weiser. The fiddle contests at Weiser today have very clear rules. Each contestant plays three tunes; one of the tunes must be a hoedown, one must be a waltz, the other is a “tune of choice” (something other than a waltz or hoedown). Some contests are held with less restrictions and include audience participation. A time limit is enforced for each fiddler. Contestants are classified into different age groups and judging is based on danceability, oldtime style, rhythm, and tone. If a contestant wins the first round they move onto the second/final round or playoff. At Weiser, competing in all of the playoffs to win the championship takes five rounds and fifteen tunes. One change that has happened in the modern era that began in 1990 or 1991 is that most contests have eliminated the separate ladies division, as acknowledgment that today’s women are as competent as the men and capable of competing on an equal basis. History of the National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest & Festival - Fiddling came to Weiser in 1863 when the Logans established a way station here and covered wagon emigrants stopped for rest and recreation. Newspaper files report fiddling contests here from 1914 to WWI. The resurrection of fiddling in Weiser was due to efforts led by Blaine Stubblefield, Chamber of Commerce Secretary from 1948 until his death in December, 1960. Blaine was raised on fiddling in Oregon’s Wallowa Valley above Hells Canyon. He had spent several years researching fiddle music for the Library of Congress. His interest in the music led him to ask the Chamber Directors to allocate $175 for a fiddle contest. Nothing happened until January, 1953, when the idea was proposed to hold the contest during intermissions of the Fifth Annual Weiser Square Dance Festival. Prize money was underwritten by two individuals and the first official fiddling event came to life on April 18, 1953. It was billed as the Northwest Mountain Fiddlers’ Contest and was a huge success. The name was changed to the Northwest Oldtime Fiddling Championships in 1956 when a regional division was added for out-of- area fiddlers. The present National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest was inaugurated in 1963 in conjunction with Idaho’s Territorial Centennial observances. Through all these years of fiddling in Weiser, the town of 5,200 people pulls hundreds of volunteers together each year in support of their nationally recognized event. This week of intense competition and endless jamming brings together young and old for the purpose of perpetuating fiddling around the world. The National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest now certifies fiddling contests in 29 states in order to facilitate interest and maintain the integrity of fiddling contests. Almost 350 contestants compete in 9 divisions each year. The week long competition also includes musical entertainment nightly from groups from around the U.S. Once you’ve been to the National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest you’ll see why Weiser has been recognized as the “Fiddling Capital Of The World”!

  • The Burren Backroom Series, launched in October of 2011, has already created many memorable, intimate, informal presentations. These shows are held in a truly atmospheric space, created by well-known traditional musicians Tommy & Louise McCarthy in Davis Square, Somerville, Masachusetts. Wednesday night shows are hosted by Brian O'Donovan of "A Celtic Sojurn" on WGBH radio, these gatherings feature core performers from many aspects of traditional music as well as special guests, & conversations around the music. Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights shows feature an eclectic mix of artists and styles of music. To see details about coming down to The Burren Backroom Series, check out www.burren.com for all list of all shows and many other musical events in our front and back rooms

  • Oshima Brothers with special guests Rainbow Girls

    Wed Jun 19th 8:00 EDT - Folk, Country

    For 60 years, Club Passim in Harvard Square has been known as a premier listening room presenting new and established performers of genres ranging from folk and acoustic to jazz, and everything in between. The historic non-profit music venue presents over 400 shows per year to an audience of over 30,000.

  • Ben David, Willow Waters

    Wed Jun 19th 9:00 EDT -

    The Warming House (www.thewarminghouse.net) is a true listening room: a space dedicated to nourishing our music community through excellent music presentation with no distractions. We are located in Minneapolis, MN and are a tax-exempt 501(c)(3) nonprofit. Your support goes a long way. Our mission is to provide an inviting space for musicians and listeners alike, raise up kick-ass beginner songwriters and performers, and offer continuing education and support for music industry professionals. Proceeds from all Concert Window broadcasts on this channel support The Warming House and therefore all of the musicians we host. Music builds community!

  • National Oldtime Fiddlers' Contest & Festival

    Wed Jun 19th 9:50 EDT - Event, Jazz

    The NOTFC is organized for the charitable and educational purposes of preserving and promoting oldtime fiddling and related traditional arts. ----------------------------------------------------------------- History of Weiser's Fiddle Contest - In 1953, the city of Weiser, Idaho began sponsoring an annual contest which has become one of the most formal and prestigious fiddler contests held. In this same year, a contest was held in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico, which saw the result of the change in judging. It was now based on standards of skill, hokum was not allowed, and there was a strict time limit for the contestants. Some of the “old-timers” had trouble adapting. One of the fiddlers, Eck Robertson played “Sally Goodin” which he usually played in about eighteen different ways, and at times took five to six minutes to play all the way through. This year, he was about half way through when the whistle blew, but he just kept on playing until someone came onto the stage and took him off. He was disqualified at this contest but in 1962 he won the senior division at Weiser. The fiddle contests at Weiser today have very clear rules. Each contestant plays three tunes; one of the tunes must be a hoedown, one must be a waltz, the other is a “tune of choice” (something other than a waltz or hoedown). Some contests are held with less restrictions and include audience participation. A time limit is enforced for each fiddler. Contestants are classified into different age groups and judging is based on danceability, oldtime style, rhythm, and tone. If a contestant wins the first round they move onto the second/final round or playoff. At Weiser, competing in all of the playoffs to win the championship takes five rounds and fifteen tunes. One change that has happened in the modern era that began in 1990 or 1991 is that most contests have eliminated the separate ladies division, as acknowledgment that today’s women are as competent as the men and capable of competing on an equal basis. History of the National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest & Festival - Fiddling came to Weiser in 1863 when the Logans established a way station here and covered wagon emigrants stopped for rest and recreation. Newspaper files report fiddling contests here from 1914 to WWI. The resurrection of fiddling in Weiser was due to efforts led by Blaine Stubblefield, Chamber of Commerce Secretary from 1948 until his death in December, 1960. Blaine was raised on fiddling in Oregon’s Wallowa Valley above Hells Canyon. He had spent several years researching fiddle music for the Library of Congress. His interest in the music led him to ask the Chamber Directors to allocate $175 for a fiddle contest. Nothing happened until January, 1953, when the idea was proposed to hold the contest during intermissions of the Fifth Annual Weiser Square Dance Festival. Prize money was underwritten by two individuals and the first official fiddling event came to life on April 18, 1953. It was billed as the Northwest Mountain Fiddlers’ Contest and was a huge success. The name was changed to the Northwest Oldtime Fiddling Championships in 1956 when a regional division was added for out-of- area fiddlers. The present National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest was inaugurated in 1963 in conjunction with Idaho’s Territorial Centennial observances. Through all these years of fiddling in Weiser, the town of 5,200 people pulls hundreds of volunteers together each year in support of their nationally recognized event. This week of intense competition and endless jamming brings together young and old for the purpose of perpetuating fiddling around the world. The National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest now certifies fiddling contests in 29 states in order to facilitate interest and maintain the integrity of fiddling contests. Almost 350 contestants compete in 9 divisions each year. The week long competition also includes musical entertainment nightly from groups from around the U.S. Once you’ve been to the National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest you’ll see why Weiser has been recognized as the “Fiddling Capital Of The World”!

  • National Oldtime Fiddlers' Contest & Festival

    Thu Jun 20th 1:20 EDT - Event, Jazz

    The NOTFC is organized for the charitable and educational purposes of preserving and promoting oldtime fiddling and related traditional arts. ----------------------------------------------------------------- History of Weiser's Fiddle Contest - In 1953, the city of Weiser, Idaho began sponsoring an annual contest which has become one of the most formal and prestigious fiddler contests held. In this same year, a contest was held in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico, which saw the result of the change in judging. It was now based on standards of skill, hokum was not allowed, and there was a strict time limit for the contestants. Some of the “old-timers” had trouble adapting. One of the fiddlers, Eck Robertson played “Sally Goodin” which he usually played in about eighteen different ways, and at times took five to six minutes to play all the way through. This year, he was about half way through when the whistle blew, but he just kept on playing until someone came onto the stage and took him off. He was disqualified at this contest but in 1962 he won the senior division at Weiser. The fiddle contests at Weiser today have very clear rules. Each contestant plays three tunes; one of the tunes must be a hoedown, one must be a waltz, the other is a “tune of choice” (something other than a waltz or hoedown). Some contests are held with less restrictions and include audience participation. A time limit is enforced for each fiddler. Contestants are classified into different age groups and judging is based on danceability, oldtime style, rhythm, and tone. If a contestant wins the first round they move onto the second/final round or playoff. At Weiser, competing in all of the playoffs to win the championship takes five rounds and fifteen tunes. One change that has happened in the modern era that began in 1990 or 1991 is that most contests have eliminated the separate ladies division, as acknowledgment that today’s women are as competent as the men and capable of competing on an equal basis. History of the National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest & Festival - Fiddling came to Weiser in 1863 when the Logans established a way station here and covered wagon emigrants stopped for rest and recreation. Newspaper files report fiddling contests here from 1914 to WWI. The resurrection of fiddling in Weiser was due to efforts led by Blaine Stubblefield, Chamber of Commerce Secretary from 1948 until his death in December, 1960. Blaine was raised on fiddling in Oregon’s Wallowa Valley above Hells Canyon. He had spent several years researching fiddle music for the Library of Congress. His interest in the music led him to ask the Chamber Directors to allocate $175 for a fiddle contest. Nothing happened until January, 1953, when the idea was proposed to hold the contest during intermissions of the Fifth Annual Weiser Square Dance Festival. Prize money was underwritten by two individuals and the first official fiddling event came to life on April 18, 1953. It was billed as the Northwest Mountain Fiddlers’ Contest and was a huge success. The name was changed to the Northwest Oldtime Fiddling Championships in 1956 when a regional division was added for out-of- area fiddlers. The present National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest was inaugurated in 1963 in conjunction with Idaho’s Territorial Centennial observances. Through all these years of fiddling in Weiser, the town of 5,200 people pulls hundreds of volunteers together each year in support of their nationally recognized event. This week of intense competition and endless jamming brings together young and old for the purpose of perpetuating fiddling around the world. The National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest now certifies fiddling contests in 29 states in order to facilitate interest and maintain the integrity of fiddling contests. Almost 350 contestants compete in 9 divisions each year. The week long competition also includes musical entertainment nightly from groups from around the U.S. Once you’ve been to the National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest you’ll see why Weiser has been recognized as the “Fiddling Capital Of The World”!

  • Ellis Paul's Tiny Living Room Concerts

    Thu Jun 20th 7:30 EDT - Rock, Jazz

    ****************************************** Ellis Paul's songwriting credentials are unassailable. They are as genuine as the fifteen Boston Music Awards he has earned, as indelible as the tattoo of Woody Guthrie that adorns his arm, and as authentic as the musical roots he draws upon with every note he plays. At the invitation of Woody's daughter, Ellis wrote a song with Woody's unpublished lyrics and was given an honorary citizenship to Okemah, OK. Woody's hometown. Ellis grew up in a potato farming family in Maine, earned a track scholarship to Boston College and got his musical start at Boston's open-mic scene while studying to be a social worker. He emerged out of the Boston music scene during a time when contemporary folk was beginning to come into the mainstream. It was a time and a place that nurtured some of the country's top singer/songwriters like, Martin Sexton, Patty Griffin and Dar Williams. Ellis was one of its more memorable exponents who earned his place on the national map with 20+ years of playing 150 to 200 shows annually. He has 19 releases, a documentary film, a book of poems/short stories, and a children's book project to his credit. Ellis' songs have been featured on Hollywood soundtracks in films such as: Me, Myself & Irene, Shallow Hal and Hall Pass, as well TV shows and documentary films. He has performed from the stages from the Newport Folk Festival, Carnegie Hall, and clubs, coffeehouses all over the world. This year, Ellis fan funded his 19th release "Chasing Beauty", produced by Sugarland's Kristian Bush. He was awarded a Honorary Degree from the University of Maine and inducted into the Maine Music Hall of Fame.

  • WUMB Presents Billy Wylder

    Thu Jun 20th 7:30 EDT - Event, Folk

    The Burren Backroom Series, launched in October of 2011, has already created many memorable, intimate, informal presentations. These shows are held in a truly atmospheric space, created by well-known traditional musicians Tommy & Louise McCarthy in Davis Square, Somerville, Masachusetts. Wednesday night shows are hosted by Brian O'Donovan of "A Celtic Sojurn" on WGBH radio, these gatherings feature core performers from many aspects of traditional music as well as special guests, & conversations around the music. Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights shows feature an eclectic mix of artists and styles of music. To see details about coming down to The Burren Backroom Series, check out www.burren.com for all list of all shows and many other musical events in our front and back rooms

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