Tagged with #folk

Show Results (161)

  • The NOTFC is organized for the charitable and educational purposes of preserving and promoting oldtime fiddling and related traditional arts. ----------------------------------------------------------------- History of Weiser's Fiddle Contest - In 1953, the city of Weiser, Idaho began sponsoring an annual contest which has become one of the most formal and prestigious fiddler contests held. In this same year, a contest was held in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico, which saw the result of the change in judging. It was now based on standards of skill, hokum was not allowed, and there was a strict time limit for the contestants. Some of the “old-timers” had trouble adapting. One of the fiddlers, Eck Robertson played “Sally Goodin” which he usually played in about eighteen different ways, and at times took five to six minutes to play all the way through. This year, he was about half way through when the whistle blew, but he just kept on playing until someone came onto the stage and took him off. He was disqualified at this contest but in 1962 he won the senior division at Weiser. The fiddle contests at Weiser today have very clear rules. Each contestant plays three tunes; one of the tunes must be a hoedown, one must be a waltz, the other is a “tune of choice” (something other than a waltz or hoedown). Some contests are held with less restrictions and include audience participation. A time limit is enforced for each fiddler. Contestants are classified into different age groups and judging is based on danceability, oldtime style, rhythm, and tone. If a contestant wins the first round they move onto the second/final round or playoff. At Weiser, competing in all of the playoffs to win the championship takes five rounds and fifteen tunes. One change that has happened in the modern era that began in 1990 or 1991 is that most contests have eliminated the separate ladies division, as acknowledgment that today’s women are as competent as the men and capable of competing on an equal basis. History of the National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest & Festival - Fiddling came to Weiser in 1863 when the Logans established a way station here and covered wagon emigrants stopped for rest and recreation. Newspaper files report fiddling contests here from 1914 to WWI. The resurrection of fiddling in Weiser was due to efforts led by Blaine Stubblefield, Chamber of Commerce Secretary from 1948 until his death in December, 1960. Blaine was raised on fiddling in Oregon’s Wallowa Valley above Hells Canyon. He had spent several years researching fiddle music for the Library of Congress. His interest in the music led him to ask the Chamber Directors to allocate $175 for a fiddle contest. Nothing happened until January, 1953, when the idea was proposed to hold the contest during intermissions of the Fifth Annual Weiser Square Dance Festival. Prize money was underwritten by two individuals and the first official fiddling event came to life on April 18, 1953. It was billed as the Northwest Mountain Fiddlers’ Contest and was a huge success. The name was changed to the Northwest Oldtime Fiddling Championships in 1956 when a regional division was added for out-of- area fiddlers. The present National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest was inaugurated in 1963 in conjunction with Idaho’s Territorial Centennial observances. Through all these years of fiddling in Weiser, the town of 5,200 people pulls hundreds of volunteers together each year in support of their nationally recognized event. This week of intense competition and endless jamming brings together young and old for the purpose of perpetuating fiddling around the world. The National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest now certifies fiddling contests in 29 states in order to facilitate interest and maintain the integrity of fiddling contests. Almost 350 contestants compete in 9 divisions each year. The week long competition also includes musical entertainment nightly from groups from around the U.S. Once you’ve been to the National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest you’ll see why Weiser has been recognized as the “Fiddling Capital Of The World”!

  • Ari & Mia with Lula Wiles

    Fri Jun 23rd 7:00 EDT - Folk, Country

    For more than 50 years, Club Passim in Harvard Square has been known as a premier listening room presenting new and established performers of genres ranging from folk and acoustic to jazz, and everything in between. The historic non-profit music venue presents over 400 shows per year to an audience of over 30,000.

  • Red Molly show for PledgeMusic Pledgers!

    Fri Jun 23rd 7:00 EDT - Folk

    The music of Red Molly is full of joy. In the words of the Boston Globe, “what is most striking is the ardor they bring to everything they do, whether snuggling into the sweet parochialism of an old spiritual or the gritty pathos of a Gillian Welch tune.” Laurie MacAllister sings and plays bass, banjo, and guitar. Abbie Gardner sings and plays guitar and Dobro. Molly Venter sings and plays guitar. The point is, they all sing – and sing beautifully, with gorgeous harmonies and soaring solos. They sing bluegrass traditionals and jazz classics, contemporary folk masterpieces and their own graceful originals. Their fourth and most recent album, Light in the Sky, includes songs by Robert Johnson, Buddy and Julie Miller, and Mark Erelli, as well as a rollicking ragtime number composed by Abbie and her father, pianist and trombonist Herb Gardner, and a grown-up lullaby by Molly. The original group came together in 2004 at the Falcon Ridge Folk Festival and quickly gained a large following. Molly joined the band this year after the departure of Caroleann Solebello. Their albums have been mainstays on the Americana charts. They played on Mountain Stage this year, and will soon tour Australia. Give their music a listen, and you’ll soon be hooked. As they sing on their red hot version of “Fever,” the classic by Otis Blackwell and Eddie Cooley, “what a lovely way to burn.”

  • MARTIN GARRISH & FRIENDS "Playing Your Ocracoke Memories"

    Fri Jun 23rd 8:00 EDT - Folk, Blues

    Welcome to the COYOTE MUSIC DEN - Live Music Concert Listening Room and Lesson Studio on the edge of the harbor in Community Square, Ocracoke Island, NC. A historic, magical setting. "Coyote Plus One" is an evening of well-crafted spontaneity with Coyote (Marcy and Lou) and a different guest each week. (Tuesdays, May 23 - Sept 26) Sponsored by Dajio Restaurant. "An evening with COYOTE - Marcy & Lou" This is a long-awaited return by popular demand of this duo to the stage - charming, powerful original songs and unique covers. (Wednesdays, May 24 - Sept 27) "Martin Garrish & Friends - "Playing Your Ocracoke Memories" hosted by this beloved island native along with Coyote (Marcy & Lou) and special guests. (Fridays, April 14 - Nov 22 Thanksgiving Show) - December 8 is the Christmas Show and final show of 2017. These "house concert style" shows are held (and broadcast live) on Ocracoke Island, NC from the COYOTE MUSIC DEN. COYOTE are Marcy Brenner & Lou Castro who make Ocracoke Island, NC their home. Ever "the trickster," Coyote draw from a huge arc of influences (and instruments!) from classical to heavy metal, in both original songs and adapting covers. They have an engaging and spontaneous presence that invites listeners and audiences into their proverbial living room with enchanting, intimate songs and colorful music tinged with folk, rock, blues and jazz flavors. For more info visit www.coyotemusic.net Coyote Music Den info only line (252) 928-6874 (music) Photos & Graphics by Jessie Morrissey, Carol Woolgar Signs by Len Skinner, Bob Imber

  • Nick Costa, Cecelia Erholtz (Tabah)

    Fri Jun 23rd 9:00 EDT -

    The Warming House (www.thewarminghouse.net) is a true listening room: a space dedicated to nourishing our music community through excellent music presentation with no distractions. We are located in Minneapolis, MN and are a tax-exempt 501(c)(3) nonprofit. Your support goes a long way. Our mission is to provide an inviting space for musicians and listeners alike, raise up kick-ass beginner songwriters and performers, and offer continuing education and support for music industry professionals. Proceeds from all Concert Window broadcasts on this channel support The Warming House and therefore all of the musicians we host. Music builds community!

  • The NOTFC is organized for the charitable and educational purposes of preserving and promoting oldtime fiddling and related traditional arts. ----------------------------------------------------------------- History of Weiser's Fiddle Contest - In 1953, the city of Weiser, Idaho began sponsoring an annual contest which has become one of the most formal and prestigious fiddler contests held. In this same year, a contest was held in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico, which saw the result of the change in judging. It was now based on standards of skill, hokum was not allowed, and there was a strict time limit for the contestants. Some of the “old-timers” had trouble adapting. One of the fiddlers, Eck Robertson played “Sally Goodin” which he usually played in about eighteen different ways, and at times took five to six minutes to play all the way through. This year, he was about half way through when the whistle blew, but he just kept on playing until someone came onto the stage and took him off. He was disqualified at this contest but in 1962 he won the senior division at Weiser. The fiddle contests at Weiser today have very clear rules. Each contestant plays three tunes; one of the tunes must be a hoedown, one must be a waltz, the other is a “tune of choice” (something other than a waltz or hoedown). Some contests are held with less restrictions and include audience participation. A time limit is enforced for each fiddler. Contestants are classified into different age groups and judging is based on danceability, oldtime style, rhythm, and tone. If a contestant wins the first round they move onto the second/final round or playoff. At Weiser, competing in all of the playoffs to win the championship takes five rounds and fifteen tunes. One change that has happened in the modern era that began in 1990 or 1991 is that most contests have eliminated the separate ladies division, as acknowledgment that today’s women are as competent as the men and capable of competing on an equal basis. History of the National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest & Festival - Fiddling came to Weiser in 1863 when the Logans established a way station here and covered wagon emigrants stopped for rest and recreation. Newspaper files report fiddling contests here from 1914 to WWI. The resurrection of fiddling in Weiser was due to efforts led by Blaine Stubblefield, Chamber of Commerce Secretary from 1948 until his death in December, 1960. Blaine was raised on fiddling in Oregon’s Wallowa Valley above Hells Canyon. He had spent several years researching fiddle music for the Library of Congress. His interest in the music led him to ask the Chamber Directors to allocate $175 for a fiddle contest. Nothing happened until January, 1953, when the idea was proposed to hold the contest during intermissions of the Fifth Annual Weiser Square Dance Festival. Prize money was underwritten by two individuals and the first official fiddling event came to life on April 18, 1953. It was billed as the Northwest Mountain Fiddlers’ Contest and was a huge success. The name was changed to the Northwest Oldtime Fiddling Championships in 1956 when a regional division was added for out-of- area fiddlers. The present National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest was inaugurated in 1963 in conjunction with Idaho’s Territorial Centennial observances. Through all these years of fiddling in Weiser, the town of 5,200 people pulls hundreds of volunteers together each year in support of their nationally recognized event. This week of intense competition and endless jamming brings together young and old for the purpose of perpetuating fiddling around the world. The National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest now certifies fiddling contests in 29 states in order to facilitate interest and maintain the integrity of fiddling contests. Almost 350 contestants compete in 9 divisions each year. The week long competition also includes musical entertainment nightly from groups from around the U.S. Once you’ve been to the National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest you’ll see why Weiser has been recognized as the “Fiddling Capital Of The World”!

  • Amelia Blake Live from the Music Room

    Sat Jun 24th 1:00 EDT -

    California native Amelia Blake combines folk/rock, singer/songwriter introspection and alternative country to form a sound that is all her own. The ninth of ten daughters, she’s been playing guitar and writing songs since childhood, heavily influenced by the standards of both her parents’ and grandparents’ musical eras, as well as the sixties’ folk sounds she learned at her older sisters’ feet. The granddaughter of a vaudeville musician and the daughter of a musician father and operatically trained mother, she absorbed the musical surroundings of her upbringing and it shows in her music. During an hour or 90 minute show, you're as likely to hear a crooner from a classic musical as you are to hear songs from the Beatles or Cat Stevens mixed in with her originals. She refuses to be locked into any one genre, borrowing from country or jazz as the mood hits her. Amelia’s voice has been described as reminiscent of Eva Cassidy, Emmylou Harris and Nanci Griffith, but her singing style harkens back to the golden age of movie musicals. She has opened for some of Americana music’s finest performing songwriters, including Slaid Cleaves, Mike Graham and Chuck Pyle. The release of her first studio album, Old Horses, in 2003 opened new doors, one of which was the inclusion of her music on the nationally syndicated radio show, Laney Goodman’s Women In Music. Her songs have been cut by Shanna Crooks, Klancy Johnson, Shelby Downing and Stacy James. In 2008, Amelia was one of only 19 songwriters chosen by Nashville writer Skip Ewing for a scholarship to attend his brainchild: songwriting retreat/workshop, “Horse & Writer“. 2008 was the first year that songwriters were chosen to attend for free based on their writing abilities, and Amelia was thrilled and honored to be included in the lineup. For several years, Amelia performed in the virtual world Second Life as Carmel Daines, allowing her to win over fans throughout the world via live internet streaming shows. Amelia married singer/songwriter Dan Garner in 2013; both were members of the acoustic trio Airheart, which featured Amelia, Dan and Paula O’Neal. The trio is an honorary member of the Louisiana Hayride, and Airheart's 2014 album, All Dressed Up, was on the ballot for the 58th Annual Grammy Awards. These days, Amelia is based in northwest Louisiana, and works as a music therapist when she's not playing gigs live or online. Tips of any size are welcome and appreciated! That's what keeps the lights on and the cats fed. :-)

  • Anne Heaton, Violet Bell opens

    Sat Jun 24th 8:00 EDT - Folk, Country

    For more than 50 years, Club Passim in Harvard Square has been known as a premier listening room presenting new and established performers of genres ranging from folk and acoustic to jazz, and everything in between. The historic non-profit music venue presents over 400 shows per year to an audience of over 30,000.

  • The Warming House (www.thewarminghouse.net) is a true listening room: a space dedicated to nourishing our music community through excellent music presentation with no distractions. We are located in Minneapolis, MN and are a tax-exempt 501(c)(3) nonprofit. Your support goes a long way. Our mission is to provide an inviting space for musicians and listeners alike, raise up kick-ass beginner songwriters and performers, and offer continuing education and support for music industry professionals. Proceeds from all Concert Window broadcasts on this channel support The Warming House and therefore all of the musicians we host. Music builds community!

  • Chuck Hawthorne & Libby Koch - thebugleboy.org

    Sat Jun 24th 9:00 EDT - Rock, Jazz

    The Bugle Boy is an intimate concert hall housed in a World War II army barracks located in La Grange, Texas. Once doors opened in January of 2005, The Bugle Boy quickly became one of the premier listening rooms in the country. Artists receive the undivided attention of the audience, and the audience gets a live music experience to remember. The focus is on original, independent singer/songwriters, who perform folk, blues, rock, jazz, swing and everything in between.

  • The NOTFC is organized for the charitable and educational purposes of preserving and promoting oldtime fiddling and related traditional arts. ----------------------------------------------------------------- History of Weiser's Fiddle Contest - In 1953, the city of Weiser, Idaho began sponsoring an annual contest which has become one of the most formal and prestigious fiddler contests held. In this same year, a contest was held in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico, which saw the result of the change in judging. It was now based on standards of skill, hokum was not allowed, and there was a strict time limit for the contestants. Some of the “old-timers” had trouble adapting. One of the fiddlers, Eck Robertson played “Sally Goodin” which he usually played in about eighteen different ways, and at times took five to six minutes to play all the way through. This year, he was about half way through when the whistle blew, but he just kept on playing until someone came onto the stage and took him off. He was disqualified at this contest but in 1962 he won the senior division at Weiser. The fiddle contests at Weiser today have very clear rules. Each contestant plays three tunes; one of the tunes must be a hoedown, one must be a waltz, the other is a “tune of choice” (something other than a waltz or hoedown). Some contests are held with less restrictions and include audience participation. A time limit is enforced for each fiddler. Contestants are classified into different age groups and judging is based on danceability, oldtime style, rhythm, and tone. If a contestant wins the first round they move onto the second/final round or playoff. At Weiser, competing in all of the playoffs to win the championship takes five rounds and fifteen tunes. One change that has happened in the modern era that began in 1990 or 1991 is that most contests have eliminated the separate ladies division, as acknowledgment that today’s women are as competent as the men and capable of competing on an equal basis. History of the National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest & Festival - Fiddling came to Weiser in 1863 when the Logans established a way station here and covered wagon emigrants stopped for rest and recreation. Newspaper files report fiddling contests here from 1914 to WWI. The resurrection of fiddling in Weiser was due to efforts led by Blaine Stubblefield, Chamber of Commerce Secretary from 1948 until his death in December, 1960. Blaine was raised on fiddling in Oregon’s Wallowa Valley above Hells Canyon. He had spent several years researching fiddle music for the Library of Congress. His interest in the music led him to ask the Chamber Directors to allocate $175 for a fiddle contest. Nothing happened until January, 1953, when the idea was proposed to hold the contest during intermissions of the Fifth Annual Weiser Square Dance Festival. Prize money was underwritten by two individuals and the first official fiddling event came to life on April 18, 1953. It was billed as the Northwest Mountain Fiddlers’ Contest and was a huge success. The name was changed to the Northwest Oldtime Fiddling Championships in 1956 when a regional division was added for out-of- area fiddlers. The present National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest was inaugurated in 1963 in conjunction with Idaho’s Territorial Centennial observances. Through all these years of fiddling in Weiser, the town of 5,200 people pulls hundreds of volunteers together each year in support of their nationally recognized event. This week of intense competition and endless jamming brings together young and old for the purpose of perpetuating fiddling around the world. The National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest now certifies fiddling contests in 29 states in order to facilitate interest and maintain the integrity of fiddling contests. Almost 350 contestants compete in 9 divisions each year. The week long competition also includes musical entertainment nightly from groups from around the U.S. Once you’ve been to the National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest you’ll see why Weiser has been recognized as the “Fiddling Capital Of The World”!

  • Matty James Cassidy - Online Acoustic Show #3

    Sun Jun 25th 11:00 EDT -

    Matty James Cassidy is a young singer-songwriter-musician from N. Ireland who pens and performs heart-felt, sing-along, tale-telling, rabble-rousing songs you can hang your hat on. With two self-released albums, hundreds of gigs across the UK and Europe and appearances at major festivals all under his belt, his experience far surpasses his years. Originally a drummer, playing in pubs and clubs across Ireland from the age of 13, Matty set sail for England a few years later and picked up the acoustic guitar as a tool to write songs. This led him down the path of the modern day troubadour, playing his own brand of folk rock n’ roll all over the country and beyond, both solo and more recently backed by a full band. He has also worked with Pat McManus (Mama’s Boys), Ricky Warwick (Thin Lizzy) and Tyla J. Pallas (The Dogs D’Amour). In addition to his own music, Matty plays with Cadaver Club and Tyla’s Dogs D’Amour.

  • Indigo

    Sun Jun 25th 1:00 EDT - Rock, Folk

    I believe that connection is one of the most important parts of the human experience that we have access, and Music has always been my way of connecting with others. Whether I am singing or writing about experiences from my life, or the lives of people I know or have met, a song has always been able to say what words alone cannot express. Music helps us connect, to people we know and to people we will never meet; yet when we feel the same about a certain song we can walk away knowing more about one another than we could ever have learned in one conversation. With a style that is reflective of Indie Pop and Neo Soul style music, yet that also sings of elements that are all my own, I choose to write songs that express our experiences in such a way that we find what connects us. Whether my inspiration is found in my own imagination or in real life situations, my main goal is always to connect: to connect with myself, to connect with others, and to connect with you. Here's to Connecting Through Creativity, -Indigo

  • Amelia Blake Live from the Music Room

    Sun Jun 25th 3:00 EDT -

    California native Amelia Blake combines folk/rock, singer/songwriter introspection and alternative country to form a sound that is all her own. The ninth of ten daughters, she’s been playing guitar and writing songs since childhood, heavily influenced by the standards of both her parents’ and grandparents’ musical eras, as well as the sixties’ folk sounds she learned at her older sisters’ feet. The granddaughter of a vaudeville musician and the daughter of a musician father and operatically trained mother, she absorbed the musical surroundings of her upbringing and it shows in her music. During an hour or 90 minute show, you're as likely to hear a crooner from a classic musical as you are to hear songs from the Beatles or Cat Stevens mixed in with her originals. She refuses to be locked into any one genre, borrowing from country or jazz as the mood hits her. Amelia’s voice has been described as reminiscent of Eva Cassidy, Emmylou Harris and Nanci Griffith, but her singing style harkens back to the golden age of movie musicals. She has opened for some of Americana music’s finest performing songwriters, including Slaid Cleaves, Mike Graham and Chuck Pyle. The release of her first studio album, Old Horses, in 2003 opened new doors, one of which was the inclusion of her music on the nationally syndicated radio show, Laney Goodman’s Women In Music. Her songs have been cut by Shanna Crooks, Klancy Johnson, Shelby Downing and Stacy James. In 2008, Amelia was one of only 19 songwriters chosen by Nashville writer Skip Ewing for a scholarship to attend his brainchild: songwriting retreat/workshop, “Horse & Writer“. 2008 was the first year that songwriters were chosen to attend for free based on their writing abilities, and Amelia was thrilled and honored to be included in the lineup. For several years, Amelia performed in the virtual world Second Life as Carmel Daines, allowing her to win over fans throughout the world via live internet streaming shows. Amelia married singer/songwriter Dan Garner in 2013; both were members of the acoustic trio Airheart, which featured Amelia, Dan and Paula O’Neal. The trio is an honorary member of the Louisiana Hayride, and Airheart's 2014 album, All Dressed Up, was on the ballot for the 58th Annual Grammy Awards. These days, Amelia is based in northwest Louisiana, and works as a music therapist when she's not playing gigs live or online. Tips of any size are welcome and appreciated! That's what keeps the lights on and the cats fed. :-)

  • Ellis Paul's songwriting credentials are unassailable. They are as genuine as the fifteen Boston Music Awards he has earned, as indelible as the tattoo of Woody Guthrie that adorns his arm, and as authentic as the musical roots he draws upon with every note he plays. At the invitation of Woody's daughter, Ellis wrote a song with Woody's unpublished lyrics and was given an honorary citizenship to Okemah, OK. Woody's hometown. Ellis grew up in a potato farming family in Maine, earned a track scholarship to Boston College and got his musical start at Boston's open-mic scene while studying to be a social worker. He emerged out of the Boston music scene during a time when contemporary folk was beginning to come into the mainstream. It was a time and a place that nurtured some of the country's top singer/songwriters like, Martin Sexton, Patty Griffin and Dar Williams. Ellis was one of its more memorable exponents who earned his place on the national map with 20+ years of playing 150 to 200 shows annually. He has 19 releases, a documentary film, a book of poems/short stories, and a children's book project to his credit. Ellis' songs have been featured on Hollywood soundtracks in films such as: Me, Myself & Irene, Shallow Hal and Hall Pass, as well TV shows and documentary films. He has performed from the stages from the Newport Folk Festival, Carnegie Hall, and clubs, coffeehouses all over the world. This year, Ellis fan funded his 19th release "Chasing Beauty", produced by Sugarland's Kristian Bush. He was awarded a Honorary Degree from the University of Maine and inducted into the Maine Music Hall of Fame.

  • Mark Lipman

    Sun Jun 25th 8:00 EDT - Folk, Country

    For more than 50 years, Club Passim in Harvard Square has been known as a premier listening room presenting new and established performers of genres ranging from folk and acoustic to jazz, and everything in between. The historic non-profit music venue presents over 400 shows per year to an audience of over 30,000.

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