Tagged with #country

Show Results (26)

  • Though Mandy Rowden started playing violin at 6 and piano at 7, she didn’t discover her songwriting talents until she was 21 — a few years after she finally unlocked a long-forbidden door to rock ‘n’ roll and had a chance to explore its oh-so-delicious temptations. Until then, her musical diet had been limited to gospel and classical, the only sounds allowed in her East Texas family’s fundamentalist Baptist household, where she was home-schooled through eighth grade. Rowden picked up a guitar in high school, and was introduced to Americana while studying English and Film at Southwest Texas State University (now Texas State). That led her to, as she puts it, “quit the classical scene,” and find her own voice. And what a voice it is, both lyrically and literally. Rowden possesses gorgeously nuanced vocals, which she wraps easily around verses baring emotions at once intensely personal and fully relatable. “Like most chick songwriters, I’ve been guilty of writing heavily about my thoughts and feelings on relationships,” she admits. “And my response is, ‘Screw it, it’s what I’m feeling, so it’s what I’ll write!’ Love and love lost are some seriously universal topics, so I don’t see them going out of style any time soon.” She certainly has a point — and makes it to great effect on her new album, Live from Opa!, recorded at one of her favorite Austin coffeehouses, and an earlier EP, Big Moon. And it’s not likely anyone’s going to quibble with lyrics like these, from “Breaks,” on Better Angels, a recording she and fellow singer-songwriter Billy Abel made before heading out on a summer 2013 tour. In a sure, yet slightly repentant voice, she sings, I’ve been reckless and I’ve been wild. I’ve melted like a candle and wept like a child. Lookin’ forward to a lifetime of things that never are, but the joy and the pain and a whole lot of scars. Nothin’ seems real when it doesn’t leave a mark, but it breaks my heart. Make no mistake, though: Rowden is hardly just another “chick songwriter.” She’s funny as heck, first off, and versatile enough to play an ever-expanding list of instruments that now includes piano, fiddle, mandolin, bass, harmonica, drums, ukulele, and banjo. (And according to one Texas critic, “When she plays the fiddle, hearts melt.”) She’s gone skydiving. And participates in triathalons. She has a cat named Lucy. And once sold all of her possessions and moved to New York. Eventually, she came back, as Texans always do. She’s tall. And she’s given up trying to pretend she’s not. In fact, Rowden isn’t the kind of person who’s likely to pretend about much — not with a “day job” that involves teaching women to become confident performers in six weeks. Rowden is the founder of Girl Guitar, which offers musical workshops for women. Whether fulfilling long-held fantasies or seeking serious career training, women attending Girl Guitar build up their chops and perform at a group-showcase finale. Seven years after Rowden launched it, Girl Guitar conducts about 22 sessions a week, including songwriting, and students report having the time of their lives. Of course, that takes honesty — not to mention diplomacy and more than a little psychology. Plus wine. But another reason for Girl Guitar’s success is Rowden’s continued dedication to her own career; she gigs regularly, solo or with Abel. She also performs in Cover Girl (yes, it’s an all-female cover band, and loads of fun), and in a weekly show called Whiskey Church, and has been known to show up alongside acclaimed singer-songwriter Sam Baker and up-and-comers Jessie Torrisi & the Please Please Me. “I’ve gone head-first into everything from the Beatles, Stones, Zep and Bowie to White Stripes to old-school country to hip-hop and everything in between,” Rowden says. She’s played in all sorts of configurations, including the Gringo All-Stars, the Cash Band (as June Carter Cash), Blackwater Gospel, The Buddy Quaid Band, and the Whiskey Tango Family Band. Clearly, she tends to follow her instincts and passions; that’s her approach with songwriting, too. Rowden’s work contains both vulnerability and determination; it comes from a woman who’s had her share of heartbreak but knows ecstasy, too. But regardless of whether she’s expressing pain or joy (or the occasional zinger punchline), for Rowden, it all boils down to one essential point. “I just love playing,” she says simply. “As long as my hands and voice work and my car gets me places, I just want to keep entertaining people, and if something I write or say influences someone positively, then bonus!” With her talents and energy, it’s safe to say she’s scored that bonus many times over.

  • Levi Lowrey Live In The Studio

    Sat Feb 25th 7:30 EST - Singer/Songwriter, Americana

    Levi Lowrey; inside My Crazy Head It has always been my belief that since the days of King David, God has picked on songwriters. Temptation, soaring highs, and the deepest hardships travel parallel to a troubadour’s life, much like the timeless lyrics they pluck from the aether. Through car wrecks and cancer, with questions unanswered, Levi Lowrey sat down and had a long conversation with himself, the result being his first independent release, My Crazy Head. After a turbulent last 5 years, Levi Lowrey has reached the top of Country Music’s charts by penning “Colder Weather”, graced the stages of the Ryman, Red Rocks, and Madison Square Garden, toured internationally with Country Music’s premier acts, and released 2 stellar albums, all while dealing with the personal tragedies affiliated with the Songwriter’s Curse. In late 2014, he took several month leave from the spotlight to tend to family, build some callouses back driving nails, and concentrate on his craft and approach to the music industry, in general. Much like his previous albums, I Confess I was A Fool (2011) and Levi Lowrey (2014), My Crazy Head is a piece of art that is felt as much as it is heard. Lowrey’s writing is both ahead of and behind the current state of Country Music. With the deepest respect to the roots of this genre, his lyrics stream the simplistically complicated storytelling of Samuel Clemens and the blue collar, everyman’s poetry of Kris Kristofferson. Not a line wasted, not a detail overlooked. Yet this is not a Country album. It’s not Folk, Bluegrass, or Rock either, although they are just as prevalent. My Crazy Head is something deeper, and much more spiritual. This could be because it was written, recorded (by Lowrey in his basement), and released all within a few creative months, or the fact that we are lucky enough to witness the raw, true genius of a master raconteur coming into his own. My greatest admiration for Levi Lowrey’s writing derives from his unabashed and brutal honesty. This is the reason for the kindred connection he shares with his faithful and almost militant fans, known as the Levites. Every song in the collection is plucked straight from Lowrey’s life, leaving the listener feeling as if they’ve personally known him for years. While “Dreamer’s Pedigree” is an ode to following one’s heart and the artist’s own primal urge to ramble, “A Maritime Song” warns of the dangers affiliated with the abandonment of loved ones for the treasures of man. “Young and Free” cuts straight to the marrow depicting Lowrey’s wife, Stephanie’s, year-long battle to defeat Hodgkin’s Lymphoma and their decision to allow their young boys to embrace childhood by not divulging the severity of her illness. You will instantly feel a lump in your throat as you hear the whole Lowrey clan singing along, especially Stephanie’s strong and beautiful harmony. While this could have easily become a dark album, My Crazy Head shines a portrait of sun breaking through a storm, full of hope and new beginnings. The anxious tempo and promise of resurrection found in “No Trouble Tomorrow” spawns directly from the artists own struggles to harness his crippling panic attacks. “Empty Canvas” is another hymn of salvation, woven between a uniquely haunting melody and chorus you will be singing along with after the first pass. The album’s title track may be the best example of his prowess as a producer and engineer, a genre-crossing anthem with commercial potential that sonically, just feels right. Still in his early 30s, Levi Lowrey is an old soul, years ahead of the miles usually necessary to create such a wealth of experience. My Crazy Head has everything we’ve come to expect from a Lowrey album. It sounds as good Saturday night with Old #7 by the burn barrel, as Sunday morning on the couch with a cup of coffee, black. It’s both old and new, a testimonial and a benediction. But there is something more to it. There is a sense of awakening, a realization by the artist that life is full of miracles and second chances. Tribulations be damned! The Songwriter’s Curse will always haunt the creative soul, but the best learn to live with it. I still believe God picks on songwriters, but He does so because He wants the most from His flock, and Levi Lowrey is among His finest. Fester Hagood February 27, 2015

  • Open every weekend since May, 1960 Caffè Lena is the longest running folk club in the country. Weekends are dedicated to folksingers, bluegrass, Americana, acoustic rock, Celtic, Klezmer, jazz, country blues, and singer-songwriters. Mid-week you'll find poetry, theater, storytelling and open mic nights. Visitor's to our 19th century building in the heart of Saratoga's historic district climb the stairs to the 2nd floor and enter a room where a world-class performer is only feet away from the audience, where they can see every movement of fingers on frets and feel a foot tapping rhythm on the stage. Run by a small paid staff, a Board of Directors, and an ever-evolving team of volunteers, the caffe is proud to stay true to Lena’s founding vision of simplicity, kindness to strangers, and art above profit. We are a 501(c)3 non-profit corporation and we welcome your tax-deductible donations! Check out our full offerings at CaffeLena.org, and learn more about our 55 years of history at CaffeLenaHistory.org. We hope to meet you in person soon!

  • Girl Guitar Band Showcase Live From One-2-One in Austin, TX

    Sun Feb 26th 3:00 EST - Folk, Country

    Though Mandy Rowden started playing violin at 6 and piano at 7, she didn’t discover her songwriting talents until she was 21 — a few years after she finally unlocked a long-forbidden door to rock ‘n’ roll and had a chance to explore its oh-so-delicious temptations. Until then, her musical diet had been limited to gospel and classical, the only sounds allowed in her East Texas family’s fundamentalist Baptist household, where she was home-schooled through eighth grade. Rowden picked up a guitar in high school, and was introduced to Americana while studying English and Film at Southwest Texas State University (now Texas State). That led her to, as she puts it, “quit the classical scene,” and find her own voice. And what a voice it is, both lyrically and literally. Rowden possesses gorgeously nuanced vocals, which she wraps easily around verses baring emotions at once intensely personal and fully relatable. “Like most chick songwriters, I’ve been guilty of writing heavily about my thoughts and feelings on relationships,” she admits. “And my response is, ‘Screw it, it’s what I’m feeling, so it’s what I’ll write!’ Love and love lost are some seriously universal topics, so I don’t see them going out of style any time soon.” She certainly has a point — and makes it to great effect on her new album, Live from Opa!, recorded at one of her favorite Austin coffeehouses, and an earlier EP, Big Moon. And it’s not likely anyone’s going to quibble with lyrics like these, from “Breaks,” on Better Angels, a recording she and fellow singer-songwriter Billy Abel made before heading out on a summer 2013 tour. In a sure, yet slightly repentant voice, she sings, I’ve been reckless and I’ve been wild. I’ve melted like a candle and wept like a child. Lookin’ forward to a lifetime of things that never are, but the joy and the pain and a whole lot of scars. Nothin’ seems real when it doesn’t leave a mark, but it breaks my heart. Make no mistake, though: Rowden is hardly just another “chick songwriter.” She’s funny as heck, first off, and versatile enough to play an ever-expanding list of instruments that now includes piano, fiddle, mandolin, bass, harmonica, drums, ukulele, and banjo. (And according to one Texas critic, “When she plays the fiddle, hearts melt.”) She’s gone skydiving. And participates in triathalons. She has a cat named Lucy. And once sold all of her possessions and moved to New York. Eventually, she came back, as Texans always do. She’s tall. And she’s given up trying to pretend she’s not. In fact, Rowden isn’t the kind of person who’s likely to pretend about much — not with a “day job” that involves teaching women to become confident performers in six weeks. Rowden is the founder of Girl Guitar, which offers musical workshops for women. Whether fulfilling long-held fantasies or seeking serious career training, women attending Girl Guitar build up their chops and perform at a group-showcase finale. Seven years after Rowden launched it, Girl Guitar conducts about 22 sessions a week, including songwriting, and students report having the time of their lives. Of course, that takes honesty — not to mention diplomacy and more than a little psychology. Plus wine. But another reason for Girl Guitar’s success is Rowden’s continued dedication to her own career; she gigs regularly, solo or with Abel. She also performs in Cover Girl (yes, it’s an all-female cover band, and loads of fun), and in a weekly show called Whiskey Church, and has been known to show up alongside acclaimed singer-songwriter Sam Baker and up-and-comers Jessie Torrisi & the Please Please Me. “I’ve gone head-first into everything from the Beatles, Stones, Zep and Bowie to White Stripes to old-school country to hip-hop and everything in between,” Rowden says. She’s played in all sorts of configurations, including the Gringo All-Stars, the Cash Band (as June Carter Cash), Blackwater Gospel, The Buddy Quaid Band, and the Whiskey Tango Family Band. Clearly, she tends to follow her instincts and passions; that’s her approach with songwriting, too. Rowden’s work contains both vulnerability and determination; it comes from a woman who’s had her share of heartbreak but knows ecstasy, too. But regardless of whether she’s expressing pain or joy (or the occasional zinger punchline), for Rowden, it all boils down to one essential point. “I just love playing,” she says simply. “As long as my hands and voice work and my car gets me places, I just want to keep entertaining people, and if something I write or say influences someone positively, then bonus!” With her talents and energy, it’s safe to say she’s scored that bonus many times over.

  • Randy Moore Hwy 59

    Tue Feb 28th 3:00 EST -

    Born in Memphis, Tennessee. Randy's dad Buzz Moore, a jet fighter pilot for the U.S. Air Force, and mom Evelyn had one son already, when the Air Force doctors told Evelyn that she had a tumor and it must be removed. Buzz, not being a follower of regulations, opted for a second opinion. Dad's "gut feeling" paid off, the tumor happened to be Randy. In 1972, Randy entered the Humble Middle School talent show, with only a few months of guitar lessons, a blue satin suit, three chords and a song. "When I walked out on that huge stage at the high school and belted out 'Dead Skunk in the Middle of the Road', I had no idea that the place will come unglued like it did … it was fun and frightening all in the same moment. " Randy took first place that night but more than anything else he got caught up in the rush of being up there, he liked the feeling. Most of the 1970’s consisted of Randy being a Texas Music Artist, promoting his first records and performing regularly at Gilley’s Club in Houston, The KWKH Louisiana Hayride, Billy Bob’s in Fort Worth and many other dance halls and concert venues. In 1978, Randy made his way to Nashville where he was introduced by the King of Country Music, Roy Acuff, on the stage of the Grand Ole Opry. "Yep, there I was on stage with Mr. Roy, the Smoky Mountain Boys and the Opry staff band doin' a hopped-up version of "Good Old Mountain Dew". What an incredible moment." Nashville television producer Jim Owens (Crook and Chase) cast Randy to play a lead role in a developing television series. "Big Al's Doggs" was the show's title, and the premise was based on a "60's "high school rock band. By then, Randy had formed another band and was burning up the road with the Knott Brothers ('cause they were "not brothers"), opening for the likes of Hank William Jr., David Allen Coe, Johnny Paycheck and a host of other country stars. Randy kept soaking up the music and writing songs. Throughout the 1980’s and 1990’s Randy embarked on his songwriting career. A feature of the Blue Bird Café and WSM Radio, he was writing songs with some of Nashville's best talents including Pat Bunch, Jessie Hunter, Restless Heart, Lone Star and the his legendary mentor, Carl Perkins. "The first time I met Carl Perkins, he was walking across his backyard and the way he moved and his way of relating things reminded me of my dad, he had that West Tennessee, salt of the southern soil thing, just like dad… I felt right at home.” In the late 1990’s Randy turned his attention back to live performance and was voted Nashville’s best Artist and Songwriter by The Tennessean (Gannett News), He won The Songwriters Network International Award. Following his performance in October 2001 alongside Bruce Springsteen to help raise funding for the devastated families on 9/11, Randy was granted the honorary Tennessee Volunteer Award by the Governor Of Tennessee (one of the state’s highest commendations). But Randy Moore is not just a local, regional, or national act. Randy is a worldwide act. He’s been featured in concerts and stages from Shanghai, China to Monaco, from Saudi Arabia to Canada. Randy’s travels and life experiences are well documented and have become the bedrock for his newest and most profound musical work, the new album “Hwy 59” by Randy Moore. The New CD has garnered immediate accolades and recognition. The first single, “Sunshine State Of Mind” is America’s # 1 Trop-Rock hit of 2016. The subsequent releases from “Hwy 59” have captured the attention of hundreds of radio programmers worldwide and won The Arzuk Radio Male Indie Artist and Classic Indie Artist of 2016, LOZ Radio’s Top 5 Artists of 2016, FCR “My Kind Of Country”One of The Best Album Releases of 2016, and Radio Medusa 1st place Christmas Song Of The Year (“Little Drummer Boy”). Moving forward, Randy Moore will be a feature of The Southeastern Events Show, Jim Parker’s Songwriter Series, Old Time Radio of Lynchburg, TN, Knoxville Radio’s Blue Plate Special, and Nashville’s Viva NashVegas among others.

  • Randy Moore More Hwy 59

    Tue Feb 28th 7:00 EST -

    Born in Memphis, Tennessee. Randy's dad Buzz Moore, a jet fighter pilot for the U.S. Air Force, and mom Evelyn had one son already, when the Air Force doctors told Evelyn that she had a tumor and it must be removed. Buzz, not being a follower of regulations, opted for a second opinion. Dad's "gut feeling" paid off, the tumor happened to be Randy. In 1972, Randy entered the Humble Middle School talent show, with only a few months of guitar lessons, a blue satin suit, three chords and a song. "When I walked out on that huge stage at the high school and belted out 'Dead Skunk in the Middle of the Road', I had no idea that the place will come unglued like it did … it was fun and frightening all in the same moment. " Randy took first place that night but more than anything else he got caught up in the rush of being up there, he liked the feeling. Most of the 1970’s consisted of Randy being a Texas Music Artist, promoting his first records and performing regularly at Gilley’s Club in Houston, The KWKH Louisiana Hayride, Billy Bob’s in Fort Worth and many other dance halls and concert venues. In 1978, Randy made his way to Nashville where he was introduced by the King of Country Music, Roy Acuff, on the stage of the Grand Ole Opry. "Yep, there I was on stage with Mr. Roy, the Smoky Mountain Boys and the Opry staff band doin' a hopped-up version of "Good Old Mountain Dew". What an incredible moment." Nashville television producer Jim Owens (Crook and Chase) cast Randy to play a lead role in a developing television series. "Big Al's Doggs" was the show's title, and the premise was based on a "60's "high school rock band. By then, Randy had formed another band and was burning up the road with the Knott Brothers ('cause they were "not brothers"), opening for the likes of Hank William Jr., David Allen Coe, Johnny Paycheck and a host of other country stars. Randy kept soaking up the music and writing songs. Throughout the 1980’s and 1990’s Randy embarked on his songwriting career. A feature of the Blue Bird Café and WSM Radio, he was writing songs with some of Nashville's best talents including Pat Bunch, Jessie Hunter, Restless Heart, Lone Star and the his legendary mentor, Carl Perkins. "The first time I met Carl Perkins, he was walking across his backyard and the way he moved and his way of relating things reminded me of my dad, he had that West Tennessee, salt of the southern soil thing, just like dad… I felt right at home.” In the late 1990’s Randy turned his attention back to live performance and was voted Nashville’s best Artist and Songwriter by The Tennessean (Gannett News), He won The Songwriters Network International Award. Following his performance in October 2001 alongside Bruce Springsteen to help raise funding for the devastated families on 9/11, Randy was granted the honorary Tennessee Volunteer Award by the Governor Of Tennessee (one of the state’s highest commendations). But Randy Moore is not just a local, regional, or national act. Randy is a worldwide act. He’s been featured in concerts and stages from Shanghai, China to Monaco, from Saudi Arabia to Canada. Randy’s travels and life experiences are well documented and have become the bedrock for his newest and most profound musical work, the new album “Hwy 59” by Randy Moore. The New CD has garnered immediate accolades and recognition. The first single, “Sunshine State Of Mind” is America’s # 1 Trop-Rock hit of 2016. The subsequent releases from “Hwy 59” have captured the attention of hundreds of radio programmers worldwide and won The Arzuk Radio Male Indie Artist and Classic Indie Artist of 2016, LOZ Radio’s Top 5 Artists of 2016, FCR “My Kind Of Country”One of The Best Album Releases of 2016, and Radio Medusa 1st place Christmas Song Of The Year (“Little Drummer Boy”). Moving forward, Randy Moore will be a feature of The Southeastern Events Show, Jim Parker’s Songwriter Series, Old Time Radio of Lynchburg, TN, Knoxville Radio’s Blue Plate Special, and Nashville’s Viva NashVegas among others.

  • The Currys Songwriting Experiment Week #5

    Tue Feb 28th 9:00 EST - Folk, Country

    We are trying a 10-week songwriting and recording experiment and would love for you to join in on the fun! Each week we'll write and record one new original song and record one cover song. Every Tuesday at 9pm EST, we will perform a show here on Concert Window to feature the songs of the week, a few old favorites, a couple requests, and hear what you think about the new tunes. Check out the tip rewards; if you tip $5, you receive a download of the original song of the week. $8 gets you the cover and original tunes! Join us as we write and sing through the winter!

  • Aubryn's Musiconversation SOLO SHOW

    Wed Mar 1st 10:00 EST - Event, Comedy

    Bored with the music being fed to you by the media? I'm here to help! Every Wednesday evening at 9pm Central (that's 7pm for you west coast people) I bring in the most talented people I can find in Nashville (we've got a never ending supply here) and hang out and play music for you guys while you get to interact with everyone else in the room including us! What better way to spend a Wednesday evening?

  • Ty Hager & the CowTippers formed in an old farmhouse outside of Murfreesboro, TN in 1993. Hager, fresh from a stint as a homeless guy in Nashville, was given shelter from his multitude of storms by some MTSU buddies, and proceeded to write 30 songs in his first 30 days. Before long, Scott Carter, Chris Jackson, and Jeff Anderson - whose band, "Big Vessel," also rehearsed at the farm (Scott lived there too, Chris had only recently moved out) - started joining in, with the vocal harmonies of Scott (lead guitar) and Chris (bass) adding a fresh and amazingly cool dynamic to Ty's whimsical-yet-deep compositions. By 1994, they'd come up with a name for the band (no one really knows HOW it came about - there was lots of beer flowing in those days - but it was most likely inspired by...um...COWS), and were playing regularly in Murfreesboro, then in Nashville. They played sporadic gigs throughout the remainder of the '90's, put out a few self-produced CD's, and gained a respectable following, but not a lot of interest from Music Row. In 2001, Ty - frustrated by the style-over-substance direction the Nashville music business had taken - moved to Austin, TX, where he was signed in 2002 to New York-based Winthrop Records, which released two CD's of Ty's music (the first, "Funny Ha Ha, Funny Strange," actually contained a couple of 'Tippers tracks). The band briefly re-united for the Nashville CD-release party for the aforementioned CD in 2003, but had pretty much gone their separate ways. Ty moved back to Nashville in 2005, where he recorded his second Winthrop release, "Songs About Life and Girls (but mostly girls)," which was produced by Steve Goodie, whom Hager met in 1988 while doing stand-up comedy. Goodie had also produced and played various instruments on half the tracks of the first CD, and the two had collaborated on various musical and comedy projects over the years. Hager opted out of his record deal in 2007, and by the next year quit music entirely, returning to his home state of Oklahoma, where he hosted morning radio shows, produced and hosted a show on the American Forces Radio Network, and wrote a novel. The music bug returned by 2014, however, and in the spring of 2016 he moved back to Nashville. Because if at first you don't succeed... Ty had kept in touch with Carter and Jackson over the years, and immediately reached out to the pair to put the band back together. Goodie became the CowTippers' drummer in October of 2016 (not coincidentally, the same month Hager quit drinking), bringing full circle a quarter-century of musical mirth and brotherhood. Ty Hager & the CowTippers kick off their monthly "First Friday Fandango" at Bobby's Idle Hour on Music Row beginning March 3rd.

  • The Currys Songwriting Experiment Week #6

    Tue Mar 7th 9:00 EST - Folk, Country

    We are trying a 10-week songwriting and recording experiment and would love for you to join in on the fun! Each week we'll write and record one new original song and record one cover song. Every Tuesday at 9pm EST, we will perform a show here on Concert Window to feature the songs of the week, a few old favorites, a couple requests, and hear what you think about the new tunes. Check out the tip rewards; if you tip $5, you receive a download of the original song of the week. $8 gets you the cover and original tunes! Join us as we write and sing through the winter!

  • Aubryn's Musiconversation feat. Jana Saltz

    Wed Mar 8th 10:00 EST - Event, Comedy

    Bored with the music being fed to you by the media? I'm here to help! Every Wednesday evening at 9pm Central (that's 7pm for you west coast people) I bring in the most talented people I can find in Nashville (we've got a never ending supply here) and hang out and play music for you guys while you get to interact with everyone else in the room including us! What better way to spend a Wednesday evening?

  • Powderbears Presents Paper Wings in Concert

    Mon Mar 13th 10:00 EDT - Folk, Country

    A continuing concert series, organized by retired ski patroller and Powder skier from Bear Valley, Phil Davis. We have presented concerts for over 20 years, and in the past few years, on a much more regular basis, thanks to my friends at the Big Sur and Shasta Fiddle Camps. Our Log Cabin Venue is snowbound during winter months, and is enjoyed by visiting ski groups and families mostly on weekends. So while most of our shows will take place on weeknights, we are also working with other possible venues in Bear Valley, to present artists on Weekends when possible. On Monday Febuary 20, at 7pm Pacific, we welcome Hoot and Holler from Massachusetts, back to the Log Cabin venue, in Bear Valley. Promoter Phil Davis is a retired ski patroller in Bear Valley, California with the nickname “Powderbear” due to the snowy conditions in which he works. Back in 1980, Phil and two friends bought a remote log cabin in the Bear Valley ski area with the intention of turning it into a cross country ski lodge. It wasn’t located near the roads; as Phil says, “I had the snow cat to get guests in, and pack a trail to the cabin.” The lodge was used as a base for a helicopter skiing operation for a few years, and then a new idea emerged. “Some of my Strawberry Music Festival Friends convinced me late one night that we should put together a gig at my Log Cabin. So our first gig was with a band they had at the time, called ‘Horse Opry,’ and it was a benefit for the local school, to send the kids on a field trip to Washington DC that next summer. Then a few years later, I met the Violin Voyager, Kim Angelis and her husband Josef, and we did a couple of house concerts with them in the next several years. It was very occasional at first.” Through a chance one-off concert with Australian band The Waifs, and then the friendly prodding of fiddler Tashina Clarridge, Phil began hosting regular concerts at the Log Cabin. In recent years he has hosted Aoife O’Donovan, The Deadly Gentlemen, Phoebe Hunt, and the 10 String Symphony, among others. Since finding a way to bring satellite internet out to the Log Cabin, Phil has recently entered the new domain of webcasting his shows. “Concert Window,” he says, “is a wonderful project that provides not only promotion of concerts, but also a funding source to help these projects stay alive. Every ticket sold on Concert Window is vote for live music. If there is a space, and you have musicians who are willing to play in your space, go for it!” If you’re interested in visiting the cabin, better pack your skis. According to Phil, “it can be reached both by downhill or cross country skis, but not by car (for 6 months of winter). The roads are packed and groomed in Bear Valley, and our cabin is located on a very private trail, about 5 minutes ski, or walk, from the nearest ‘groomed road.’ For first time non skiing guests, and for musicians and equipment, we can transport you via snowmobile and cargo sled to the cabin. Once you know where it is, it's a pleasant walk, and in moonlight, it is a piece of pure magic.” We appreciate the support of those who know the magic of live music. Please come, or tune in online and contribute what you can to help this project support live music and touring musicians.

  • The Currys Songwriting Experiment Week #7

    Tue Mar 14th 9:00 EDT - Folk, Country

    We are trying a 10-week songwriting and recording experiment and would love for you to join in on the fun! Each week we'll write and record one new original song and record one cover song. Every Tuesday at 9pm EST, we will perform a show here on Concert Window to feature the songs of the week, a few old favorites, a couple requests, and hear what you think about the new tunes. Check out the tip rewards; if you tip $5, you receive a download of the original song of the week. $8 gets you the cover and original tunes! Join us as we write and sing through the winter!

  • The Currys Songwriting Experiment Week #8

    Tue Mar 21st 9:00 EDT - Folk, Country

    We are trying a 10-week songwriting and recording experiment and would love for you to join in on the fun! Each week we'll write and record one new original song and record one cover song. Every Tuesday at 9pm EST, we will perform a show here on Concert Window to feature the songs of the week, a few old favorites, a couple requests, and hear what you think about the new tunes. Check out the tip rewards; if you tip $5, you receive a download of the original song of the week. $8 gets you the cover and original tunes! Join us as we write and sing through the winter!

  • Drew Kennedy

    Wed Mar 22nd 8:30 EDT - Folk, Country

  • Jesse Burdick & Friends

    Sat Mar 25th 7:00 EDT -

    Bluegrass banjo player, singer, and songwriter currently living in Virginia. Working on a new bluegrass album "Hops And Spirits" www.JesseBurdick.com

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