Tagged with #classical

Show Results (12)

  • LIVE In Your Living Room!

    Tue Mar 28th 3:00 EDT - Classical, Rock

    "One of our greatest rock guitarist" - Guitar Techniques Magazine A reputation for doing the seemingly impossible" - David Mead (Guitarist Magazine)" One of the most amazing players around" - Neal Morse (Spock's Beard, Transatlantic)" Totally mind blowing!" - Pat Badger (Extreme) UK guitarist Paul Bielatowicz is best known for his virtuoso work with some of the biggest names in progressive rock. He’s played, recorded and toured the world with the likes of Carl Palmer (ELP), Neal Morse (Spock’s Beard, Transatlantic), Mike Portnoy (Dream Theater), Paul Gilbert (Mr. Big), Les Paul... Paul’s 2014 debut solo album, Preludes & Etudes, saw him stripping the electric guitar back to basics, presenting it as a classical instrument – no overdubs, effects or studio tricks: just a guitar, an old amp and lots of practice! "For as long as I can remember, ever since I was a small child, I've had a dream - to play the guitar with the skill and musicality of a classical virtuoso, while maintaining the purity of the instrument’s natural tone. I've done everything I can to make Preludes & Etudes the realization of that dream."

  • LIVE In Your Living Room!

    Tue Mar 28th 8:00 EDT - Classical, Rock

    "One of our greatest rock guitarist" - Guitar Techniques Magazine A reputation for doing the seemingly impossible" - David Mead (Guitarist Magazine)" One of the most amazing players around" - Neal Morse (Spock's Beard, Transatlantic)" Totally mind blowing!" - Pat Badger (Extreme) UK guitarist Paul Bielatowicz is best known for his virtuoso work with some of the biggest names in progressive rock. He’s played, recorded and toured the world with the likes of Carl Palmer (ELP), Neal Morse (Spock’s Beard, Transatlantic), Mike Portnoy (Dream Theater), Paul Gilbert (Mr. Big), Les Paul... Paul’s 2014 debut solo album, Preludes & Etudes, saw him stripping the electric guitar back to basics, presenting it as a classical instrument – no overdubs, effects or studio tricks: just a guitar, an old amp and lots of practice! "For as long as I can remember, ever since I was a small child, I've had a dream - to play the guitar with the skill and musicality of a classical virtuoso, while maintaining the purity of the instrument’s natural tone. I've done everything I can to make Preludes & Etudes the realization of that dream."

  • Debussy VS. Dovrak

    Tue Apr 4th 9:00 EDT -

    Hi, My name is Catherine Stay. I am 26 years old and I was born with cerebral palsy. I got off rather lucky as far as this disease goes. I suppose my story really begins about 18 years ago when I was eight years old before that I had just been noodling around on my grandparents' portable keyboard. When I was eight years old I took piano lessons for about six months, and then the teacher just kind of gave up on me because I wasn't able to use my feet for the pedals. Shortly after that I began playing the piano on my own before school started everyday I'd sneak into the living room before the bus came. This continued from when I was 8 until I was about 16. In between that, there came the sixth grade orchestra orientation in which I wanted to play the cello(that didn't work out), and about a year of choir in eighth grade. I didn't take choir again until I was about 18, my senior year of high school. I guess my not being able to play the cello in sixth grade led me to play the violin eight years later. About six months after I graduated from high school, I picked up the violin. I have to use a left-handed violin instead of the regular right-handed violin because of my cerebral palsy.(thanks to a friend who had recommended it to me). This friend even helped me determine the correct size for my violin(which is three quarters instead of the normal full-size). After I acquired my violin the next step was to find a teacher I looked for teacher for about three months until I finally found one that looked promising. However, this teacher would prove to be exactly like my piano teacher. she gave up on the after one day. As far as the violin went, I taught myself using various methods for about four years(Suzuki, Applebaum, Galamian and others). I have to be honest, I'm not a big fan of the Suzuki method (but to each their own I guess). Finally when I did acquire a violin teacher, we just had to up and move away from the suburbs(that was really annoying). There's no violin teachers up where I live at least none that I can easily get to. However teaching myself again has gone very well.

  • All-Sacred Concet

    Sun Apr 9th 4:00 EDT - Classical, Jazz

    Ars Arvole is the music of composer-pianist Krystal J. Folkestad Grant. She performs keyboard improvisations and arrangements influenced by Bach, bebop, and Buena Vista Social Club. Her career has broadened from giving lecture-recitals in elementary schools of her hometown, Birmingham, Alabama to presenting multimedia installations in New York City. With her undergraduate degree in piano from Vanderbilt University and her Ph.D. in composition from Stony Brook University, she teaches in Lancaster, Pennsylvania while sharing life with others through making music.

  • Debussy VS. Dovrak(Replay)

    Tue Apr 18th 8:00 EDT -

    Hi, My name is Catherine Stay. I am 26 years old and I was born with cerebral palsy. I got off rather lucky as far as this disease goes. I suppose my story really begins about 18 years ago when I was eight years old before that I had just been noodling around on my grandparents' portable keyboard. When I was eight years old I took piano lessons for about six months, and then the teacher just kind of gave up on me because I wasn't able to use my feet for the pedals. Shortly after that I began playing the piano on my own before school started everyday I'd sneak into the living room before the bus came. This continued from when I was 8 until I was about 16. In between that, there came the sixth grade orchestra orientation in which I wanted to play the cello(that didn't work out), and about a year of choir in eighth grade. I didn't take choir again until I was about 18, my senior year of high school. I guess my not being able to play the cello in sixth grade led me to play the violin eight years later. About six months after I graduated from high school, I picked up the violin. I have to use a left-handed violin instead of the regular right-handed violin because of my cerebral palsy.(thanks to a friend who had recommended it to me). This friend even helped me determine the correct size for my violin(which is three quarters instead of the normal full-size). After I acquired my violin the next step was to find a teacher I looked for teacher for about three months until I finally found one that looked promising. However, this teacher would prove to be exactly like my piano teacher. she gave up on the after one day. As far as the violin went, I taught myself using various methods for about four years(Suzuki, Applebaum, Galamian and others). I have to be honest, I'm not a big fan of the Suzuki method (but to each their own I guess). Finally when I did acquire a violin teacher, we just had to up and move away from the suburbs(that was really annoying). There's no violin teachers up where I live at least none that I can easily get to. However teaching myself again has gone very well.

  • Solo Piano Artists Joseph Akins & Christine Brown, from Nashville, TN

    Sat Apr 22nd 8:30 EDT - Classical, New Age

    Whisperings Solo Piano Radio presents live concerts featuring award winning contemporary original solo piano by renowned artists. Join us from Piano Haven Studio in Sedona & various locations across the USA for an evening of solo piano artistry and the inspiring stories behind the songs, music to quiet your world... tune in at www.solopianoradio.com

  • Sarasate Showcase

    Fri May 5th 9:00 EDT -

    Hi, My name is Catherine Stay. I am 26 years old and I was born with cerebral palsy. I got off rather lucky as far as this disease goes. I suppose my story really begins about 18 years ago when I was eight years old before that I had just been noodling around on my grandparents' portable keyboard. When I was eight years old I took piano lessons for about six months, and then the teacher just kind of gave up on me because I wasn't able to use my feet for the pedals. Shortly after that I began playing the piano on my own before school started everyday I'd sneak into the living room before the bus came. This continued from when I was 8 until I was about 16. In between that, there came the sixth grade orchestra orientation in which I wanted to play the cello(that didn't work out), and about a year of choir in eighth grade. I didn't take choir again until I was about 18, my senior year of high school. I guess my not being able to play the cello in sixth grade led me to play the violin eight years later. About six months after I graduated from high school, I picked up the violin. I have to use a left-handed violin instead of the regular right-handed violin because of my cerebral palsy.(thanks to a friend who had recommended it to me). This friend even helped me determine the correct size for my violin(which is three quarters instead of the normal full-size). After I acquired my violin the next step was to find a teacher I looked for teacher for about three months until I finally found one that looked promising. However, this teacher would prove to be exactly like my piano teacher. she gave up on the after one day. As far as the violin went, I taught myself using various methods for about four years(Suzuki, Applebaum, Galamian and others). I have to be honest, I'm not a big fan of the Suzuki method (but to each their own I guess). Finally when I did acquire a violin teacher, we just had to up and move away from the suburbs(that was really annoying). There's no violin teachers up where I live at least none that I can easily get to. However teaching myself again has gone very well.

  • Berklee Concert Choir

    Mon May 8th 8:00 EDT - Event, Rock

    Located in the historic Back Bay, the Berklee Performance Center (BPC) is at the core of Boston's entertainment and cultural community. Showcasing over 200 events each year, the BPC may just be the busiest theatre in Boston, and it is certainly the most unique. Owned and operated by Berklee College of Music, the BPC hosts concerts by talented students, faculty, and visiting artists, as well as a wide variety of productions presented by outside promoters, arts presenters, and community organizations. Events at the BPC span every musical genre and represent a broad range of countries and cultures, from traditional artists to contemporary innovators defining the future of music.

  • The Sylvia Herold Ensemble

    Wed May 17th 10:30 EDT - Classical, Rock

    We did it! Thank you for making our <a href="https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/853847054/abbiewpresents-live-streamed-acoustic-music">KICKSTARTER Campaign</a></strong> to IMPROVE our Concert Window experience successful. <br> We are a house concert series in SE Portland, OR consistently presenting high quality acoustic music of all genres from all over the world in a cozy acoustic space that supports both audience & musicians. We have presented over 300 shows over the past 7 years. See <a href="http://www.froggie.com">www.froggie.com</a> for complete calendar of events. Watch the Oregon Art Beat feature on our series! <a href="http://www.pbs.org/video/2350907398/">www.pbs.org/video/2350907398/ </a>.

  • Sarasate Showcase(Replay)

    Fri May 19th 8:00 EDT -

    Hi, My name is Catherine Stay. I am 26 years old and I was born with cerebral palsy. I got off rather lucky as far as this disease goes. I suppose my story really begins about 18 years ago when I was eight years old before that I had just been noodling around on my grandparents' portable keyboard. When I was eight years old I took piano lessons for about six months, and then the teacher just kind of gave up on me because I wasn't able to use my feet for the pedals. Shortly after that I began playing the piano on my own before school started everyday I'd sneak into the living room before the bus came. This continued from when I was 8 until I was about 16. In between that, there came the sixth grade orchestra orientation in which I wanted to play the cello(that didn't work out), and about a year of choir in eighth grade. I didn't take choir again until I was about 18, my senior year of high school. I guess my not being able to play the cello in sixth grade led me to play the violin eight years later. About six months after I graduated from high school, I picked up the violin. I have to use a left-handed violin instead of the regular right-handed violin because of my cerebral palsy.(thanks to a friend who had recommended it to me). This friend even helped me determine the correct size for my violin(which is three quarters instead of the normal full-size). After I acquired my violin the next step was to find a teacher I looked for teacher for about three months until I finally found one that looked promising. However, this teacher would prove to be exactly like my piano teacher. she gave up on the after one day. As far as the violin went, I taught myself using various methods for about four years(Suzuki, Applebaum, Galamian and others). I have to be honest, I'm not a big fan of the Suzuki method (but to each their own I guess). Finally when I did acquire a violin teacher, we just had to up and move away from the suburbs(that was really annoying). There's no violin teachers up where I live at least none that I can easily get to. However teaching myself again has gone very well.

  • A Summer Beginning: Elgar & Saint-Saens

    Fri Jun 2nd 9:00 EDT -

    Hi, My name is Catherine Stay. I am 26 years old and I was born with cerebral palsy. I got off rather lucky as far as this disease goes. I suppose my story really begins about 18 years ago when I was eight years old before that I had just been noodling around on my grandparents' portable keyboard. When I was eight years old I took piano lessons for about six months, and then the teacher just kind of gave up on me because I wasn't able to use my feet for the pedals. Shortly after that I began playing the piano on my own before school started everyday I'd sneak into the living room before the bus came. This continued from when I was 8 until I was about 16. In between that, there came the sixth grade orchestra orientation in which I wanted to play the cello(that didn't work out), and about a year of choir in eighth grade. I didn't take choir again until I was about 18, my senior year of high school. I guess my not being able to play the cello in sixth grade led me to play the violin eight years later. About six months after I graduated from high school, I picked up the violin. I have to use a left-handed violin instead of the regular right-handed violin because of my cerebral palsy.(thanks to a friend who had recommended it to me). This friend even helped me determine the correct size for my violin(which is three quarters instead of the normal full-size). After I acquired my violin the next step was to find a teacher I looked for teacher for about three months until I finally found one that looked promising. However, this teacher would prove to be exactly like my piano teacher. she gave up on the after one day. As far as the violin went, I taught myself using various methods for about four years(Suzuki, Applebaum, Galamian and others). I have to be honest, I'm not a big fan of the Suzuki method (but to each their own I guess). Finally when I did acquire a violin teacher, we just had to up and move away from the suburbs(that was really annoying). There's no violin teachers up where I live at least none that I can easily get to. However teaching myself again has gone very well.

  • Hi, My name is Catherine Stay. I am 26 years old and I was born with cerebral palsy. I got off rather lucky as far as this disease goes. I suppose my story really begins about 18 years ago when I was eight years old before that I had just been noodling around on my grandparents' portable keyboard. When I was eight years old I took piano lessons for about six months, and then the teacher just kind of gave up on me because I wasn't able to use my feet for the pedals. Shortly after that I began playing the piano on my own before school started everyday I'd sneak into the living room before the bus came. This continued from when I was 8 until I was about 16. In between that, there came the sixth grade orchestra orientation in which I wanted to play the cello(that didn't work out), and about a year of choir in eighth grade. I didn't take choir again until I was about 18, my senior year of high school. I guess my not being able to play the cello in sixth grade led me to play the violin eight years later. About six months after I graduated from high school, I picked up the violin. I have to use a left-handed violin instead of the regular right-handed violin because of my cerebral palsy.(thanks to a friend who had recommended it to me). This friend even helped me determine the correct size for my violin(which is three quarters instead of the normal full-size). After I acquired my violin the next step was to find a teacher I looked for teacher for about three months until I finally found one that looked promising. However, this teacher would prove to be exactly like my piano teacher. she gave up on the after one day. As far as the violin went, I taught myself using various methods for about four years(Suzuki, Applebaum, Galamian and others). I have to be honest, I'm not a big fan of the Suzuki method (but to each their own I guess). Finally when I did acquire a violin teacher, we just had to up and move away from the suburbs(that was really annoying). There's no violin teachers up where I live at least none that I can easily get to. However teaching myself again has gone very well.

guest-chat-id-223