Tagged with #classical

Show Results (12)

  • Hi, My name is Catherine Stay. I am 26 years old and I was born with cerebral palsy. I got off rather lucky as far as this disease goes. I suppose my story really begins about 18 years ago when I was eight years old before that I had just been noodling around on my grandparents' portable keyboard. When I was eight years old I took piano lessons for about six months, and then the teacher just kind of gave up on me because I wasn't able to use my feet for the pedals. Shortly after that I began playing the piano on my own before school started everyday I'd sneak into the living room before the bus came. This continued from when I was 8 until I was about 16. In between that, there came the sixth grade orchestra orientation in which I wanted to play the cello(that didn't work out), and about a year of choir in eighth grade. I didn't take choir again until I was about 18, my senior year of high school. I guess my not being able to play the cello in sixth grade led me to play the violin eight years later. About six months after I graduated from high school, I picked up the violin. I have to use a left-handed violin instead of the regular right-handed violin because of my cerebral palsy.(thanks to a friend who had recommended it to me). This friend even helped me determine the correct size for my violin(which is three quarters instead of the normal full-size). After I acquired my violin the next step was to find a teacher I looked for teacher for about three months until I finally found one that looked promising. However, this teacher would prove to be exactly like my piano teacher. she gave up on the after one day. As far as the violin went, I taught myself using various methods for about four years(Suzuki, Applebaum, Galamian and others). I have to be honest, I'm not a big fan of the Suzuki method (but to each their own I guess). Finally when I did acquire a violin teacher, we just had to up and move away from the suburbs(that was really annoying). There's no violin teachers up where I live at least none that I can easily get to. However teaching myself again has gone very well.

  • Life - CD Release Concert with Michele McLaughlin

    Sat Feb 25th 7:00 EST - Classical, Jazz

    Michele McLaughlin is a Contemporary Solo Pianist & Composer. She has released fifteen albums, many of which have received multiple nominations and awards, including "Album of the Year", "Song of the Year" and "Top Picks". Her original solo piano compositions are often described as "musical storytelling" and are haunting and contagious, relaxing and beautiful, peaceful and touching, energetic and inspiring. Her music is a regular favorite on Pandora Radio and is a bestseller on iTunes and Amazon, often landing her in the Top Ten New Age Charts. You can listen to Michele online via Whisperings Solo Piano Radio, Pandora Radio, iTunes Radio, Spotify, XM/Sirius and Music Choice Soundscapes. Michele performs and tours regularly and runs her own in-home concert series in Salt Lake City, Utah. "McLaughlin is what I refer to as a "heart on her sleeve" composer, i.e. there is no subterfuge, no subtlety at work in her music - she presents her emotional intent of a song forthwith and front and center. It's a testament to her considerable talent that this baring of her soul always works so well, because in the hands of a lesser talent, the music would be melodramatic, overly self-conscious, and would grow tiresome. However, it's not just her technique and artistry, which is impossible to ignore, but also her artist's soul, which seems woven into every piece of music she writes. No matter how pyrotechnic she can be (and this woman can really play piano with the best of 'em), there is always the presence of heart, sometimes "in your face" and sometimes between the lines, but never hidden behind artifice." Bill Binkelman- Wind & Wire and Zone Music Reporter

  • Highlights from Project Anime

    Fri Mar 3rd 9:00 EST -

    Hi, My name is Catherine Stay. I am 26 years old and I was born with cerebral palsy. I got off rather lucky as far as this disease goes. I suppose my story really begins about 18 years ago when I was eight years old before that I had just been noodling around on my grandparents' portable keyboard. When I was eight years old I took piano lessons for about six months, and then the teacher just kind of gave up on me because I wasn't able to use my feet for the pedals. Shortly after that I began playing the piano on my own before school started everyday I'd sneak into the living room before the bus came. This continued from when I was 8 until I was about 16. In between that, there came the sixth grade orchestra orientation in which I wanted to play the cello(that didn't work out), and about a year of choir in eighth grade. I didn't take choir again until I was about 18, my senior year of high school. I guess my not being able to play the cello in sixth grade led me to play the violin eight years later. About six months after I graduated from high school, I picked up the violin. I have to use a left-handed violin instead of the regular right-handed violin because of my cerebral palsy.(thanks to a friend who had recommended it to me). This friend even helped me determine the correct size for my violin(which is three quarters instead of the normal full-size). After I acquired my violin the next step was to find a teacher I looked for teacher for about three months until I finally found one that looked promising. However, this teacher would prove to be exactly like my piano teacher. she gave up on the after one day. As far as the violin went, I taught myself using various methods for about four years(Suzuki, Applebaum, Galamian and others). I have to be honest, I'm not a big fan of the Suzuki method (but to each their own I guess). Finally when I did acquire a violin teacher, we just had to up and move away from the suburbs(that was really annoying). There's no violin teachers up where I live at least none that I can easily get to. However teaching myself again has gone very well.

  • Bruce Gandy Music

    Sat Mar 11th 2:30 EST - Classical, Folk

  • Highlights from Project Anime(Replay)

    Fri Mar 17th 8:00 EDT -

    Hi, My name is Catherine Stay. I am 26 years old and I was born with cerebral palsy. I got off rather lucky as far as this disease goes. I suppose my story really begins about 18 years ago when I was eight years old before that I had just been noodling around on my grandparents' portable keyboard. When I was eight years old I took piano lessons for about six months, and then the teacher just kind of gave up on me because I wasn't able to use my feet for the pedals. Shortly after that I began playing the piano on my own before school started everyday I'd sneak into the living room before the bus came. This continued from when I was 8 until I was about 16. In between that, there came the sixth grade orchestra orientation in which I wanted to play the cello(that didn't work out), and about a year of choir in eighth grade. I didn't take choir again until I was about 18, my senior year of high school. I guess my not being able to play the cello in sixth grade led me to play the violin eight years later. About six months after I graduated from high school, I picked up the violin. I have to use a left-handed violin instead of the regular right-handed violin because of my cerebral palsy.(thanks to a friend who had recommended it to me). This friend even helped me determine the correct size for my violin(which is three quarters instead of the normal full-size). After I acquired my violin the next step was to find a teacher I looked for teacher for about three months until I finally found one that looked promising. However, this teacher would prove to be exactly like my piano teacher. she gave up on the after one day. As far as the violin went, I taught myself using various methods for about four years(Suzuki, Applebaum, Galamian and others). I have to be honest, I'm not a big fan of the Suzuki method (but to each their own I guess). Finally when I did acquire a violin teacher, we just had to up and move away from the suburbs(that was really annoying). There's no violin teachers up where I live at least none that I can easily get to. However teaching myself again has gone very well.

  • Debussy VS. Dovrak

    Tue Apr 4th 9:00 EDT -

    Hi, My name is Catherine Stay. I am 26 years old and I was born with cerebral palsy. I got off rather lucky as far as this disease goes. I suppose my story really begins about 18 years ago when I was eight years old before that I had just been noodling around on my grandparents' portable keyboard. When I was eight years old I took piano lessons for about six months, and then the teacher just kind of gave up on me because I wasn't able to use my feet for the pedals. Shortly after that I began playing the piano on my own before school started everyday I'd sneak into the living room before the bus came. This continued from when I was 8 until I was about 16. In between that, there came the sixth grade orchestra orientation in which I wanted to play the cello(that didn't work out), and about a year of choir in eighth grade. I didn't take choir again until I was about 18, my senior year of high school. I guess my not being able to play the cello in sixth grade led me to play the violin eight years later. About six months after I graduated from high school, I picked up the violin. I have to use a left-handed violin instead of the regular right-handed violin because of my cerebral palsy.(thanks to a friend who had recommended it to me). This friend even helped me determine the correct size for my violin(which is three quarters instead of the normal full-size). After I acquired my violin the next step was to find a teacher I looked for teacher for about three months until I finally found one that looked promising. However, this teacher would prove to be exactly like my piano teacher. she gave up on the after one day. As far as the violin went, I taught myself using various methods for about four years(Suzuki, Applebaum, Galamian and others). I have to be honest, I'm not a big fan of the Suzuki method (but to each their own I guess). Finally when I did acquire a violin teacher, we just had to up and move away from the suburbs(that was really annoying). There's no violin teachers up where I live at least none that I can easily get to. However teaching myself again has gone very well.

  • Debussy VS. Dovrak(Replay)

    Tue Apr 18th 8:00 EDT -

    Hi, My name is Catherine Stay. I am 26 years old and I was born with cerebral palsy. I got off rather lucky as far as this disease goes. I suppose my story really begins about 18 years ago when I was eight years old before that I had just been noodling around on my grandparents' portable keyboard. When I was eight years old I took piano lessons for about six months, and then the teacher just kind of gave up on me because I wasn't able to use my feet for the pedals. Shortly after that I began playing the piano on my own before school started everyday I'd sneak into the living room before the bus came. This continued from when I was 8 until I was about 16. In between that, there came the sixth grade orchestra orientation in which I wanted to play the cello(that didn't work out), and about a year of choir in eighth grade. I didn't take choir again until I was about 18, my senior year of high school. I guess my not being able to play the cello in sixth grade led me to play the violin eight years later. About six months after I graduated from high school, I picked up the violin. I have to use a left-handed violin instead of the regular right-handed violin because of my cerebral palsy.(thanks to a friend who had recommended it to me). This friend even helped me determine the correct size for my violin(which is three quarters instead of the normal full-size). After I acquired my violin the next step was to find a teacher I looked for teacher for about three months until I finally found one that looked promising. However, this teacher would prove to be exactly like my piano teacher. she gave up on the after one day. As far as the violin went, I taught myself using various methods for about four years(Suzuki, Applebaum, Galamian and others). I have to be honest, I'm not a big fan of the Suzuki method (but to each their own I guess). Finally when I did acquire a violin teacher, we just had to up and move away from the suburbs(that was really annoying). There's no violin teachers up where I live at least none that I can easily get to. However teaching myself again has gone very well.

  • Sarasate Showcase

    Fri May 5th 9:00 EDT -

    Hi, My name is Catherine Stay. I am 26 years old and I was born with cerebral palsy. I got off rather lucky as far as this disease goes. I suppose my story really begins about 18 years ago when I was eight years old before that I had just been noodling around on my grandparents' portable keyboard. When I was eight years old I took piano lessons for about six months, and then the teacher just kind of gave up on me because I wasn't able to use my feet for the pedals. Shortly after that I began playing the piano on my own before school started everyday I'd sneak into the living room before the bus came. This continued from when I was 8 until I was about 16. In between that, there came the sixth grade orchestra orientation in which I wanted to play the cello(that didn't work out), and about a year of choir in eighth grade. I didn't take choir again until I was about 18, my senior year of high school. I guess my not being able to play the cello in sixth grade led me to play the violin eight years later. About six months after I graduated from high school, I picked up the violin. I have to use a left-handed violin instead of the regular right-handed violin because of my cerebral palsy.(thanks to a friend who had recommended it to me). This friend even helped me determine the correct size for my violin(which is three quarters instead of the normal full-size). After I acquired my violin the next step was to find a teacher I looked for teacher for about three months until I finally found one that looked promising. However, this teacher would prove to be exactly like my piano teacher. she gave up on the after one day. As far as the violin went, I taught myself using various methods for about four years(Suzuki, Applebaum, Galamian and others). I have to be honest, I'm not a big fan of the Suzuki method (but to each their own I guess). Finally when I did acquire a violin teacher, we just had to up and move away from the suburbs(that was really annoying). There's no violin teachers up where I live at least none that I can easily get to. However teaching myself again has gone very well.

  • Berklee Concert Choir

    Mon May 8th 8:00 EDT - Event, Rock

    Located in the historic Back Bay, the Berklee Performance Center (BPC) is at the core of Boston's entertainment and cultural community. Showcasing over 200 events each year, the BPC may just be the busiest theatre in Boston, and it is certainly the most unique. Owned and operated by Berklee College of Music, the BPC hosts concerts by talented students, faculty, and visiting artists, as well as a wide variety of productions presented by outside promoters, arts presenters, and community organizations. Events at the BPC span every musical genre and represent a broad range of countries and cultures, from traditional artists to contemporary innovators defining the future of music.

  • Sarasate Showcase(Replay)

    Fri May 19th 8:00 EDT -

    Hi, My name is Catherine Stay. I am 26 years old and I was born with cerebral palsy. I got off rather lucky as far as this disease goes. I suppose my story really begins about 18 years ago when I was eight years old before that I had just been noodling around on my grandparents' portable keyboard. When I was eight years old I took piano lessons for about six months, and then the teacher just kind of gave up on me because I wasn't able to use my feet for the pedals. Shortly after that I began playing the piano on my own before school started everyday I'd sneak into the living room before the bus came. This continued from when I was 8 until I was about 16. In between that, there came the sixth grade orchestra orientation in which I wanted to play the cello(that didn't work out), and about a year of choir in eighth grade. I didn't take choir again until I was about 18, my senior year of high school. I guess my not being able to play the cello in sixth grade led me to play the violin eight years later. About six months after I graduated from high school, I picked up the violin. I have to use a left-handed violin instead of the regular right-handed violin because of my cerebral palsy.(thanks to a friend who had recommended it to me). This friend even helped me determine the correct size for my violin(which is three quarters instead of the normal full-size). After I acquired my violin the next step was to find a teacher I looked for teacher for about three months until I finally found one that looked promising. However, this teacher would prove to be exactly like my piano teacher. she gave up on the after one day. As far as the violin went, I taught myself using various methods for about four years(Suzuki, Applebaum, Galamian and others). I have to be honest, I'm not a big fan of the Suzuki method (but to each their own I guess). Finally when I did acquire a violin teacher, we just had to up and move away from the suburbs(that was really annoying). There's no violin teachers up where I live at least none that I can easily get to. However teaching myself again has gone very well.

  • A Summer Beginning: Elgar & Saint-Saens

    Fri Jun 2nd 9:00 EDT -

    Hi, My name is Catherine Stay. I am 26 years old and I was born with cerebral palsy. I got off rather lucky as far as this disease goes. I suppose my story really begins about 18 years ago when I was eight years old before that I had just been noodling around on my grandparents' portable keyboard. When I was eight years old I took piano lessons for about six months, and then the teacher just kind of gave up on me because I wasn't able to use my feet for the pedals. Shortly after that I began playing the piano on my own before school started everyday I'd sneak into the living room before the bus came. This continued from when I was 8 until I was about 16. In between that, there came the sixth grade orchestra orientation in which I wanted to play the cello(that didn't work out), and about a year of choir in eighth grade. I didn't take choir again until I was about 18, my senior year of high school. I guess my not being able to play the cello in sixth grade led me to play the violin eight years later. About six months after I graduated from high school, I picked up the violin. I have to use a left-handed violin instead of the regular right-handed violin because of my cerebral palsy.(thanks to a friend who had recommended it to me). This friend even helped me determine the correct size for my violin(which is three quarters instead of the normal full-size). After I acquired my violin the next step was to find a teacher I looked for teacher for about three months until I finally found one that looked promising. However, this teacher would prove to be exactly like my piano teacher. she gave up on the after one day. As far as the violin went, I taught myself using various methods for about four years(Suzuki, Applebaum, Galamian and others). I have to be honest, I'm not a big fan of the Suzuki method (but to each their own I guess). Finally when I did acquire a violin teacher, we just had to up and move away from the suburbs(that was really annoying). There's no violin teachers up where I live at least none that I can easily get to. However teaching myself again has gone very well.

  • Hi, My name is Catherine Stay. I am 26 years old and I was born with cerebral palsy. I got off rather lucky as far as this disease goes. I suppose my story really begins about 18 years ago when I was eight years old before that I had just been noodling around on my grandparents' portable keyboard. When I was eight years old I took piano lessons for about six months, and then the teacher just kind of gave up on me because I wasn't able to use my feet for the pedals. Shortly after that I began playing the piano on my own before school started everyday I'd sneak into the living room before the bus came. This continued from when I was 8 until I was about 16. In between that, there came the sixth grade orchestra orientation in which I wanted to play the cello(that didn't work out), and about a year of choir in eighth grade. I didn't take choir again until I was about 18, my senior year of high school. I guess my not being able to play the cello in sixth grade led me to play the violin eight years later. About six months after I graduated from high school, I picked up the violin. I have to use a left-handed violin instead of the regular right-handed violin because of my cerebral palsy.(thanks to a friend who had recommended it to me). This friend even helped me determine the correct size for my violin(which is three quarters instead of the normal full-size). After I acquired my violin the next step was to find a teacher I looked for teacher for about three months until I finally found one that looked promising. However, this teacher would prove to be exactly like my piano teacher. she gave up on the after one day. As far as the violin went, I taught myself using various methods for about four years(Suzuki, Applebaum, Galamian and others). I have to be honest, I'm not a big fan of the Suzuki method (but to each their own I guess). Finally when I did acquire a violin teacher, we just had to up and move away from the suburbs(that was really annoying). There's no violin teachers up where I live at least none that I can easily get to. However teaching myself again has gone very well.

guest-chat-id-514