The Weavils

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The Weavils are a Seattle based Bluegrass/Americana band. Not happy with a single genre our set includes Bluegrass, Folk, Country, Cajun, and even a few Hawaiin tunes. We do a mix of covers and original music.

Greg Lawless: banjo, ukele, jaw harp, vocals, percussion - Using the sacred banjo maxims “every song can be improved by playing it faster” and “louder is better” Greg has been... more

The Weavils are a Seattle based Bluegrass/Americana band. Not happy with a single genre our set includes Bluegrass, Folk, Country, Cajun, and even a few Hawaiin tunes. We do a mix of covers and original music.

Greg Lawless: banjo, ukele, jaw harp, vocals, percussion - Using the sacred banjo maxims “every song can be improved by playing it faster” and “louder is better” Greg has been “improving” the Weavils songs for many years. As an Irish left handed banjo picking lawyer there frankly are no jokes that are not applicable to Greg. Valued by the group because they practice at Greg’s house and he always provides popcorn and sodas, Greg also sings lead now and again, and will, if forced, play the guitar.

Pete Thorn: rythm guitar, backup vocals, bandero - There are some pluses and minuses to having an engineer in your musical group. The plus with Pete is that he’s a great guy, who plays a mean rhythm guitar, does the high harmonies, and can recite the periodic table of the elements, should that prove necessary during a performance. The down side is that if you ask Pete a question like “what is the root note in a G chord”, rather than give the answer most people would “G”, Pete will answer something like this “If we know A is at 440 Hertz and use that as a constant, since the relationship between frequencies and musical steps is exponential.......”

Mark Myers: 6/8 dobro, lap steel, harmonica, guitar, vocals - Marked joined a well known bluegrass band in the San Francisco area as an accomplished dobro player when he was 20 years old where they had him play.......the harmonica.During this time Mark played with the likes of Vassar Clemments. After a few years of that, Mark left and has played with a number of bands, and taught the Dobro. No one in the group is positive how old Mark really is, but by our reckoning, if he has played the Dobro since he was 14 years old, that would mean he’s been playing Dobro for almost 130 years. A marine biologist by trade, the Weavils asked Mark to join them because he is an outstanding Dobro player, and can give them fishing tips.

Dave Grout: lead vocals, washboard, percussion - When most guys hear Dave sing, they exclaim that they would give their right “important body part” to have a voice like that. Dave is the master of harmony, which he learned at an early age. His father, a Presbyterian Minister, needed Dave to sing harmony in the Church choir. A traditionalist, Richard Grout encouraged Dave to sing the old fashioned way. “Boy, you’re a gunna sing about joy and stuff, or I’m gunna whup your butt”. Dave has squandered his talents for years with the Seattle Bach Choir, but luckily he has elevated his music to singing baritone with the Weavils.

Mike Karbowski:bass, whistle, dancing, vocals - An accomplished surgeon and anesthesiologist, Mike’s interest in the bass actually started during a complicated surgery. Looking into the patient’s body cavity Mike asked the surgical nurse next to him “wonder what it would sound like if I plucked this thing?” Music historians still disagree whether it was a colon, or small intestine. In any event, Mike plucked it, liked the sound and decided he was a bass man. It didn’t take very long for him to realize he couldn’t always bring cadavers to jams, so bought himself a stand up bass, and has been plucking ever since. Mike is a true bass man. He sings bass, plays second base for his softball team and likes to fish for bass.

Mark Steudel: Fiddle, Mandolin, Guitar, Clawhammer Banjo, Vocals - Mark started playing the classical violin at the age of four. Somewhere during highschool he decided that classical guitar was way cooler and he stopped playing the violin. He went on to study classical guitar for a year at Western Washington University. Soon there after he left school and played in a funk band called the Gentleman's Gruvmachine. After lugging his "violin" around for years, he finally figured out that his "violin" was really a fiddle. In 2002 he began instruction from national fiddle champion Pete Martin.

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